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18 Free Saguaro National Park Boondocking Spots

Saguaro National Park Hiking and Boondocking Tips

Saguaro National Park is considered one of the most beautiful and unique places in Arizona, the United States, and the world. There are hidden gems in this fantastic park that visiting to find out will make your trip memorable. Here is why you should visit Saguaro National Park in Arizona.

What You Will Find In Saguaro National Park

1. Saguaros

This Park is full of the tree-like cactus species known as saguaros. If you are an outdoor enthusiast that is nature-oriented, this is one of the reasons you should visit this park. The Park is choke-full of saguaros giving it an incredible sight that is lovely. For a saguaro to grow its first arm, it may take 75-100 years, making these plants in the park a bit old. Additionally, despite this national park being located in the desert, it receives more precipitation than most arid areas, responsible for the thick cactus forests along the trails there. There is a lot of greenery due to the saguaros in the over 165 miles of trails in this park.

2. Animals

Saguaro National Park is home to multiple wildlife that you will be able to see during your visit. Besides, there are typical desert creatures in this park. Some of the animals that call this park home are javelina, bobcat, coyote, vulture, roadrunner, hummingbird, Gila monsters (venomous lizards), and even bark scorpions. Additionally, you may even get a chance to see a jaguar roaming or the endangered thick-billed parrot on a saguaro during your visit.

3. Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum

This spectacular desert was founded in 1952, and it will provide you with an incredible outdoor experience. The museum is located five minutes from the west entrance of Saguaro National Park. Sonoran desert’s flora, fauna, natural history, and landscape are among the things you will get details about during your visit. Additionally, you will find multiple interesting exhibits, scientific experts to learn from and see and meet a lot of animals rescued around the desert. Most of the animals in this desert are nocturnal, and it is too hot during the day; hence you should visit in the morning hours when most animals are more responsive.

4. Hiking, Camping, and Backpacking.

Saguaro National Park features well-maintained trails for hiking. Due to this, hiking is the most popular activity in this park. There are excellent trails in eastern and western districts that you can use for short and long walks. Additionally, this park has lovely places that are great for camping and backpacking.

5. Wildflowers

There are more than 100 species of flowers in Saguaro National Park. When visiting during the spring season, you will find the Sonoran Desert annual flowers blooming. Additionally, if you are keen, you will see the wildflowers blossom, providing the park with beauty. Between April and June, the saguaros bloom and produce beautiful white flowers. It would be best if you visited before mid-afternoon since the flowers close at that time.

6. Two districts

Saguaro National Park comprises Rincon Mountain District on the east and Tucson Mountain District on the west. You will be able to visit both of them at a price of one, giving you more places and terrains to explore.

7. Cactus Forest Loop Drive

This beautiful park features an 8-mile drive with plenty of scenic views and pullouts. This drive-in Saguaro National Park is an excellent place for cycling and running, and it provides access to several trails, even for mountain biking.

8. Photography Ops

Saguaro National Park features unique places for taking photos. During spring, you can take stunning images of flowers. You can also take photos of moody sunsets and lightning storms.

Saguaro National Park

18 Free and 2 Permit Camping Spots for Saguaro National Park

1. Saguaro National Park Free Campsites and Boondocking – 6 Miles: – E Redington Rd – Santa Catalina Mountains

Address
Tucson, Arizona
GPS: 32.261879, -110.649788
Elevation: 3766′

Management – Public – Forest Service (USDA) (Unofficial)

The road in is Dirt. There are 16-29 campsites at this location and the maximum RV length is 32′. You may stay 14 Nights at E Redington Rd – Santa Catalina Mountains. View of Tucson from atop the Santa Catalina mountains. Lots of 4x4 traffic and gun shots. There are tons of 4x4 trails on this road. There is also a shooting range further up the road. Excellent Sprint Evdo Internet connection. The view of Tucson at night is to die for. Stayed for 3 days.

There are more sites all along the road. No facilities.

This is a mountain road, but it is maintained. Its seems to be three lanes wide in many places, but always at least two lanes. Small trailers shouldn’t be an issue. I saw lots of folks hauling their toys up the mountain on trailers.

Activities:

OHV
Horse Trails

1. E Redington Rd 1 1. E Redington Rd 2

2. Saguaro National Park West Free Campsites and Boondocking – 16 Miles: – Exit 297 off I 10

Address
Benson, Arizona
GPS: 31.99294, -110.43501
Elevation: 4091′

Management – Public (Unofficial)

The road in is Dirt and 50 ft miles from a paved road. Exit 297 off I 10 is open all. There are 1-5 campsites at this location and the maximum RV length is unlimited. You may stay overnight at Exit 297 off I 10. Go north on Mescal Rd to the railroad tracks and then on over them to the mailboxes and room there to camp overnight.

Only if you are desperate to find a spot to spend the night, it’s the last option. Car trafic and very loud train horn.

Stayed here in a Truck Camper (RV).

Activities:

RV Parking

3. Saguaro National Park Free Campsites and Boondocking – 17 Miles: – Incinerator Ridge

Address
865 Mount Lemmon Highway
Mount Lemmon, Arizona
GPS: 32.409167, -110.701334
Elevation: 8140′

Management – Public – Forest Service

Incinerator Ridge is open May – Nov.

Free Dispersed camping in the Coronado National Forest’s Santa Catalina Ranger District. No reservations. First come, first served. This is a high elevation location.

Great spot to escape the heat. It was 112 degrees in town and at this camp spot it was 84 degrees. The gps coordinates end just a little before the actual rode appears. Along the road are many campsites. It’s very busy and every spot was taken when we arrived- we got ours just in time. Night time was peaceful. Got to catch a gorgeous sunset and sunrise.

Activities:

Tent Camping
Hiking
Wildlife Viewing

3 Incinerator Ridge 2 3 Incinerator Ridge 3 3 Incinerator Ridge 1

4. Saguaro National Park West Campsites and Boondocking – 17 Miles: – Bigelow Road – Santa Catalina Mountains

Address
Bigelow Rd.
Mount Lemmon, Arizona
GPS: 32.413776, -110.720987
Elevation: 8383′

Management – Public – Forest Service (Official)

Free dispersed camping all along Bigelow Rd. No facilities but bathroom just down the road a piece if you want to jump in your car

The road in is Dirt and 1 miles from a paved road. There are 16-29 campsites at this location.

4 Bigelow Road 1 4 Bigelow Road 2

5. Saguaro National Park Free Campsites and Boondocking – 22 Miles: – Redfield Canyon

Address
Unnamed Road
Willcox, Arizona
GPS: 32.431644, -110.388638
Elevation: 3222′

Management – Public – Bureau of Land Management

Redfield Canyon is open all year. Free Dispersed camping in the Bureau of Land Management Safford District. First come -> first camped. No reservations are accepted. Be very careful, I actually had to turn stone before getting here. I was heading north to mammoth, and took a road east to this camp site, but actually had to turn around and find somewhere else because my 4x4 could not fit between the cholla. Perhaps there is another route to this campsite I don’t know about, but I found the way into this one impassable by car

Activities:

Wildlife Viewing

6. Saguaro National Park West Campsites and Boondocking – 25 Miles: – Muleshoe Ranch

Address
Forest Service Road 691
Willcox, Arizona
GPS: 32.33786, -110.238687
Elevation: 4078′

Management – BLM

This free campsite is located within the Bureau of Land Management Safford District.

7. Saguaro National Park Free Campsites and Boondocking – 28 Miles: – Cieneguita Primitive Camp Area

Address
Yucca Ash Farm Rd
Sonoita, Arizona
GPS: 31.76661, -110.62722
Elevation: 4607′

Management – Public – Bureau of Land Managment (Official)

The road in is Dirt. Cieneguita Primitive Camp Area is open year round. There are 6-15 campsites at this location. You may stay 14 days at Cieneguita Primitive Camp Area. This free, designated primitive camping area is located in open grassland and has six sites with no developments. Tents and RVs are welcome. There are also group campsites near by for a small fee.

The Las Cienegas National Conservation Area (NCA) can be enjoyed year-round since each season provides opportunities to enjoy the unique features of the NCA’s landscape, however fall and spring provide the most comfortable temperatures.

A four-wheel drive or high clearance vehicle is not required to access the site. The Cieneguita Camp Area allows motorized use on the designated roads. Compacted gravel parking sites are available. There are no wheelchair accessible features or facilities at the site.

Activities:

Hiking
Horse Trails
Wildlife Viewing

7 Cieneguita Primitive Camp Area 1 7 Cieneguita Primitive Camp Area 2 7 Cieneguita Primitive Camp Area 3

8. Saguaro National Park West Campsites and Boondocking – 29 Miles: – Old Ajo Highway Campground

Address
Tucson Estates, Arizona
GPS: 32.1614, -111.1038
Elevation: 2507′

Management – Public – Bureau of Land Management (Official)

After a LONG day of driving and getting to a first come first serve campsite that was completely packed, we were not sure what to do. The neighborhood where Walmart is located has a HOA that doesn’t allow RV’s to park overnight, the usual (Cabela’s, rest stops, etc), were all pretty far away, everywhere was fully booked… BUT… Old Ajo BLM land was our savior.

8 Old Ajo Highway Campground 1

9. Saguaro National Park Free Campsites and Boondocking – 6 Miles: – Snyder Hill BLM

Address
Tucson, Arizona
GPS: 32.156941, -111.116493
Elevation: 2471′

Management – Public – Bureau of Land Managment (Unofficial)

Free dry camping just off Highway 86 and S San Joaquin Rd. This is a little patch of BLM in the middle of major development. Nicer than you might expect. Desert trees and a picturesque rocky hillside.

Arrived on a Monday around noon and this place was is pretty bad shape. Garbage everywhere (piles of trash bags, someone dropped off a big screen tv (old style that weights probably 200lbs) and just other junk. Looked like a few of the “campers” were more like squatters. Road noise is significant, broken glass and rutted roads throughout. Sure this is convient if you are wanting to visit Saguaro NP but there are far better options north of the park.

The road in is Paved. Snyder Hill BLM is open All Year. There are 30 or more campsites at this location and the maximum RV length is Any. You may stay 14 days at Snyder Hill BLM.

9. Snyder Hill BLM 1 9. Snyder Hill BLM 2

10. Saguaro National Park West Campsites and Boondocking – 30 Miles: – Kentucky Camp

Address
Arizona Trail
Sonoita, Arizona
GPS: 31.747933, -110.740999
Elevation: 5236′

Management – Public – Forest Service

Free Dispersed camping in the Coronado National Forest’s Nogales Ranger District. First come -> first camped. No reservations are accepted.

Activities:

Wildlife Viewing

11. Saguaro National Park Free Campsites and Boondocking – 30 Miles: – Gardner Canyon – Coronado National Forest

Address
Sonoita, Arizona
GPS: 31.734566, -110.67701
Elevation: 4755′

Management – Public – Forest Service (USDA) (Official)

Gardner Canyon – Coronado National Forest is open Year Round. There are 1-5 campsites at this location. You may stay 14 Days at Gardner Canyon – Coronado National Forest. ispersed camping along Gardner Canyon road in the Coronado National Forest. No facilities. The land 1/2 a mile on each side of highway 83 is state trust land. This area requires a permit.

Once you drive 1/2mi west, you are on BLM land and will continue to be for the next 1/4 mile. After that, it’s forest service land. See the attached image.

Activities:

Hiking
Wildlife Viewing

11. Gardner Canyon 1 11. Gardner Canyon 2

12. Saguaro National Park West Campsites and Boondocking – 30 Miles: – Cracker Barrel

Address
8400 N Cracker barrel rd
Marana, Arizona
GPS: 32.35972, -111.09272
Elevation: 2159′

Management – Private – Retail Store

The road in is Paved. There are 6-15 campsites at this location and the maximum RV length is unlimited. You may stay Unknown at Cracker Barrel.

13. Saguaro National Park Free Campsites and Boondocking – 32 Miles: – Willcox AZ, I-10 E & W bound.

Address
Dragoon, Arizona
GPS: 32.06068, -110.07616
Elevation: 4964′

Management – Public – Rest Area (Official)

14. Saguaro National Park West Campsites and Boondocking – 33 Miles: – Gardner Canyon

Address
Patagonia, Arizona
GPS: 31.706682, -110.775327

Management – Public – Forest Service (Official)

The road in is Gravel. Gardner Canyon is open 365. There are 16-29 campsites at this location. There are 5 large Marked Sites closer to the beginning of the road. There are numerous Dispersed Camping sites all along Gardner Canyon Road and Upper Gardner Canyon road (785). As with most of Southern Arizona TRAVEL CAUTION Smuggling and Illegal Immigration may be encountered in this area

Activities:

RV Parking
Tent Camping
OHV
Hiking
Wildlife Viewing

15. Saguaro National Park Free Campsites and Boondocking – 33 Miles: – White House Ruins

Address
South Madera Canyon Road
Green Valley, Arizona
GPS: 31.741184, -110.886011
Elevation: 4452′

Management – Public – Forest Service

The Whitehouse area is named for the nearby ruins of an old white adobe house built at the mouth of Madera Canyon in the 1880’s. Tables and charcoal grills here are tucked under mesquite and oak trees a short distance from Madera Creek. In addition to the single table sites, facilities include a large ramada for group get-togethers . Wildlife watching is at the top of the menu at Whitehouse. The Madera Nature Trail, portions of which are paved and barrier free, lead from the picnic area into a nearby mesquite and oak woodland and sycamore-shaded riparian area.

Amenities:

Drinking Water
Restrooms

Activities:

Hiking
Wildlife Viewing

16. Saguaro National Park West Campsites and Boondocking – 33 Miles: – Madera Canyon – Proctor Rd

Address
Green Valley, Arizona
GPS: 31.74021, -110.893487
Elevation: 4321′

Management – Public – Forest Service (Official)

The road in is Dirt and 1/2 mile to 2 miles miles from a paved road. Madera Canyon – Proctor Rd is open year round. There are 6-15 campsites at this location and the maximum RV length is 25 feet. You may stay 14 days at Madera Canyon – Proctor Rd. Right before you enter Madera canyon, turn right on proctor Rd. There are 10 campsites generously spaced apart sights. We pulled our 20 ft travel trailer down this dirt Rd with no problem.

16 Madera Canyon 1 16 Madera Canyon 2

17. Saguaro National Park Free Campsites and Boondocking – 38 Miles: – Cochise Stronghold West

Address
Toombstone, Arizona
GPS: 31.898001, -110.038483
Elevation: 4937′

Management – Public – Forest Service (USDA) (Unofficial)

Cochise Stronghold West is open year round. Many dispersed campsites on the west side of the stronghold. 2WD accessible, no facilities.

Activities:
Hiking

18. Saguaro National Park West Campsites and Boondocking – 38 Miles: – Mt. Hopkins Rd

Address
Amado, Arizona
GPS: 31.70093, -111.00367
Elevation: 3507′

Management – Public – Bureau of Land Management (Official)

The road in is Paved. Mt. Hopkins Rd is open all year. The maximum RV length at Mt. Hopkins Rd is 35 feet. You may stay no limit at Mt. Hopkins Rd. A great place to camp, on BLM land. Between Tucson & Nogales, off I-19 freeway, use exit 48. Get on Frontage RD. (east side) and turn off on Elephant Head RD, to Whipple Observatory. A couple of miles up are several turnouts…all BLM land. Very quiet & dark at night… Great reception for Verizon

Activities:

RV Parking
Tent Camping
Wildlife Viewing

18 Mt. Hopkins Rd 1 18 Mt. Hopkins Rd 2

Low Cost Permit Camping

Some of this camping is much closer to the areas around Saguaro East

1. Saguaro National Park Free Campsites and Boondocking – 6 Miles: – E Via Rancho Del Cielo

Address
Santa Rita, Arizona
GPS: 32.077793, -110.633864
Elevation: 3527′

Management – Arizona State Trust Land

Good lil spot camping here tonight not alot of people around just one other fellow truck camper down the way.

Pretty desert out here. We saw the sheriff so make sure you have bought and printed out your state land permit — there’s no free camping in the area. Quite a few houses further down Pistol Hill Rd so there is some traffic and locals come out to roost their dirtbikes and atvs at times — one came at 10pm to make noise right next to us. Verizon signal is there but didn’t work for us without using a booster. Also most of the few sites are small and need high clearance. I would not recommend going down any of the 2-tracks without scouting.

2. Saguaro National Park West Campsites and Boondocking – 15 Miles: – Mescal Rd

Address
Benson, Arizona
GPS: 32.011853, -110.428905

Management – Arizona State Trust Land

Exit 297 on I-10, about 5 mi. west of Benson. Go north…Paved road turns to dirt at 3 mi. I only went another mile to find a big area to camp. Very quiet! Views for miles & miles, great sunset last night. A big plus is the Tucson Movie set of the Old West. Tours on some weekends from Feb.-June.

My husband and I stayed one night, Feb. 15, 2020. We LOVED it! The owner came immediately to check our permit (one of the best things we have ever bought!). He was so welcoming and extremely polite. He, Frank, took the time to tell us about his family, the land and the wildlife that we might see. We would have stayed longer, but had previous commitments. We will definitely be back!! Thanks, Frank!!

Shelter Saguaro National Park
Photo courtesy of My Travel Photos at Flicker: This stone picnic shelter at Ez-Kim-In-Zin Picnic Area was built by the Civilian Conservation corps in the 1930’s.

History of Mount Saguaro National Park

In 1933, President Herbert Hoover established the Saguaro National Monument in the Rincon Mountains. Before the creation of this park, there were residents and visitors around it. The Hohokam, Sobaipuri, Tohono O’odham, Apaches, Spanish explorers, missionaries, miners, homesteaders, and ranches inhabited this area before the creation of the National monument in 1933.

In 1961, the Tucson Mountain District was added to the Saguaro National Monument by President John F. Kennedy. It took years and involvement by representatives, senators, and presidents before Saguaro National Park was formed on 14th October 1994 by the congress. This Park covers around 370 square kilometers, and it is divided into two districts, i.e., Tucson Mountain District on the western and Rincon Mountain District on the eastern side. Currently, Saguaro National Park features beautiful plants, trails, hills, and animals that call it home. There are archaeological sites in this national park spanning over 8,000 years of prehistoric and historic-period occupation.

How to Get to the Mount Saguaro National Park

Saguaro National Park is divided into two districts that are geographically separated by Tucson city. The two districts that make this beautiful park are Rincon Mountain District (RMD), mainly known as Saguaro East, and the Tucson Mountain District (TMD), commonly known as Saguaro West. Here is how you can easily get to Saguaro National Park.

Rincon Mountain District, Saguaro East.

From the City of Tucson, you will travel east on Broadway to Freeman Road and then turn right and drive south for 3 miles. Then you will turn left, where you will get onto Old Spanish Trail, where you will drive for another 25 miles southeast to the entrance of this park on your left side of the road.

From Interstate 10, you will take Exit I- 10 at Exit #275 in Houghton Road and drive 8 miles north. You will then turn right on Escalante Road and drive for another 2 miles and turn left where you will get to Old Spanish Trail and go for another 0.3 miles and turn right on the park’s entrance.

Tucson Mountain District, Saguaro West.

From north of Tucson, you will take I- 10 to Avra Valley Road exit 242 and drive 6 miles west to Sandario Road and then turn left(south) and drive for another 14 miles before turning left onto Kinney Road. From there, you will go for another 2 miles, where you will find The Red Hills Visitor Center on your left.

From the center of Tucson, you drive west on Speedway Boulevard over Gates Pass to Kinney Road. (Your vehicle should be less than 12,000 lbs. and less than 25 feet) you will then drive for 4 miles after turning right (north) on Kinney Road up to the junction of Kinney and Mile Wide Roads and then turn right to the park, where you will drive for another 1 mile to the Red Hills Visitor Center on your right.

From south of Tucson, you will take exit I 19 onto Ajo Way (State Route 86) and drive west to Kinney Road and turn right then drive for 18 miles along Kinney Road where you will find the junction of Kinney and Mile Wide Roads and then turn right into the national park and continue driving for another 1 mile on Kinney Road where you will get to the park’s entrance on your right.

Saguro Cactus Saguaro National Park

Places and Things to Do and See In Saguaro National Park

1. Embrace cactus diversity at the Cactus Garden Trail

During your visit to Saguaro National Park’s visitor center, you can take on the 0.5-mile trail that heads towards the cactus garden. In the cactus garden, you will find many different types of cacti and get to learn more about the multiple cactus and their benefits to the desert environment.

2. Scenic Bajada Loop Drive

During your visit to Saguaro National Park, you should never fail to marvel at this drive. This scenic loop drive is an over 6-mile well-maintained gravel road featuring hills and bumps. While traveling on this road, you will see multiple things, including plants, wildlife, and the saguaro cactus. Additionally, there are picnic areas, viewpoints, and trailheads along this loop. You can stop at the viewpoints and have spectacular views of the park

3. View ancient petroglyphs at Signal Hill

This rocky façade is one of the most visited places in Saguaro National Park. It is a 0.5-mile hike to this attraction. During your visit, you will be able to see around 200 ancient Native American petroglyphs made by the Hohokam people hundreds of years back. Some of the petroglyphs include a large spiral, images of animals, and other abstract representations. You will also have beautiful views of the park from this hill. You can relax in the serene and shady picnic area around this hill.

4. Cactus Forest Loop Drive

This sightseeing is found in the Rincon Mountain District in Saguaro National Park. This loop drive is an 8-mile paved road with access to multiple trailheads, overlooks, and stunning views. The tallest cacti in Saguaro National Park are found along this loop drive. During your visit, you can climb on top of the Javelina rocks and have fantastic views of Saguaro National Park and Tucson as a whole. Cycling is common along this loop, and you can easily access multiple hiking trailheads from this loop drive.

5. Desert Discovery Trail

If you want to have spectacular views of the sunset during your visit to Saguaro National Park, you should stop at the Desert Discovery Trail. You will be able to see the sunset behind the mountains.

6. Arizona Sonora Desert Museum

This is another place to visit while in Saguaro National Park, although it is not part of the national park. It is a great place to stop by if you want to get more details about the park and the desert ecosystem. This attraction is a 98-acre zoo, aquarium, botanical garden, natural history museum, publisher, and art gallery. There are two miles of walking paths, over 230 animal species, 1,200 varieties of plants, and you will be able to see during your visit.

op Trails to Hike at Saguaro National Park with detailed descriptions

Saguaro National Park is an excellent destination featuring more than 165 miles of hiking trails. The highlights of Saguaro National Park are hiking trails, saguaro cacti, and the Rincon Mountains. The best time to go hiking at Saguaro National Park is between October and April, when the weather is a bit cool since this national park is located in the middle of the Arizona desert with scorching heat.

Here are the top 5 trails in Saguaro National Park, perfect for hiking.

1. Mica View Loop Trail

1 Mica View Trail

Mica View – Cholla – Cactus Forest Loop Trail is a 3.7 mile heavily trafficked loop trail located near Tucson, Arizona that features beautiful wild flowers and is good for all skill levels. The trail is primarily used for hiking, walking, running, and bird watching and is accessible year-round.

This is one of the best trails in Saguaro National Park, located at Rincon Mountain District (East). The trail is approximately 3.7 miles long. This trail has an elevation gain of 121 feet, and it is a loop-type of the trail. Mica View Loop trail is one of the most visited trails in Saguaro National Park due to its accessibility for all hiking levels and stunning wildflowers. Additionally, this trail is open all year round, and you can go hiking there very early in the morning or in the evening. The beginning parts of this trail are sandy, while the last parts are paved. While hiking, you may spot snakes, bobcats, and even here coyotes, and therefore, you should be vigilant.

Length: 3.7 mi
Elevation Gain: 121 ft
Route Type: Loop

Interactive Map Link

Trail Highlights:

Kid friendly
Hiking
Walking
Bird watching
Running
Forest Views
Wildflowers
Wildlife
No Dogs

1 Mica View Loop Trail

2. Valley View Overlook Trail

2. Valley View Overlook Trail

Valley View Overlook is a short trail only measuring .08 of a mile. The trail at the right time of the year offers great flowering cactus and for that reason along with being near Tucson draws a ton of attention. The trail is easy to hike and worth your time but do it on a weekeday when the traffic on the trail will be much lighter.

This hiking trail is located in Tucson Mountain District (West), and it spans around 0.8 miles. The trail has an elevation gain of 49 feet, and it is an out & back type of trail. The 0.8-mile hiking trail is an easy trail making it a popular hiking spot in Saguaro National Park. Additionally, you can go hiking on this trail during any time of the year, and since it is an easy trail, it is a perfect place in Saguaro National Park that you can go hiking with kids. Along the trail, there are no shades, and therefore, you should venture here early in the morning or late in the evening when it is a bit cooler. On this trail, there are snakes, lizards, rabbits, and many more that you should watch out for, and you may get a chance to see.

Length: 0.8 mi
Elevation Gain: 49 ft
Route Type: Out & Back

Interactive Map Link

Trail Highlights:

Kid friendly
Hiking
Nature trips
Walking
Bird watching
Views
Wildflowers
Wildlife
No dogs

2. Valley View Overlook Trail

3. Garwood Trail

3. Garwood Trail

Hiking on the Garwood tail is usually a family affair but it is 3.3 long and should only be used if your young ones are teenages. The best times to hike any of the Saguaro National Park trails is September to May due to the high temps in Arizona.

This is another easy to access and hike. The trail is located at Rincon Mountain District in Saguaro National Park. The trail spans around 3.3 miles, and it is an out and back-trail type. Due to the easiness to access and hike in, hikers of all skill levels visit it frequently during their visit to Saguaro National Park. Saguaro National Park has scorching weather, and it hugs the edge of mountains; hence it does not have many shades, and therefore you go hiking there with a lot of water and wear a hat. The best time to visit this trail is from September till May. While hiking, you will be able to see beautiful saguaros, prickly pears, and even cholla. Gila monsters are common along this trail, and therefore you should watch out for them.

Length: 3.3 mi
Elevation Gain: 203 ft
Route Type: Out & Back

Interactive Map Link

Trail Highlights:

Kid friendly
Hiking
Walking
No dogs

3. Garwood Trail

4. Bridal Wreath Falls Trail

4. Bridal Wreath Falls Trail

Bridal Wreath Falls Trail is a 5.7 mile trail and due to its close proximity to Tucson is used quite heavily on weekend. For thatreson we would recommend that you use this trail on weekdays between September to May to avoid the heat. The trail does have some great do do to its length not made for the family with very young children.

This trail is considered one of the heavily trafficked trails in Saguaro National Park. The trail spans around 5.6 miles, and it is an out and back trail with an elevation gain of 1,072 feet. This top trail is located at Rincon Mountain District in Saguaro National Park. There are excellent views over the Arizona wilderness and a waterfall you will find while hiking along this trail. The best time to hike along this trail is around 5 a.m. and 6 a.m. when the temperatures are tolerable and during winter when it is a bit cooler. It is not easy to spot an animal while hiking on this trail despite desert tortoises and snakes like diamondbacks being spotted by hikers at one time. It would be best if you carried with you a lot of water when going hiking on this trail.

Length: 2.2 mi
Elevation Gain: 291 ft
Route Type: Out & Back

Interactive Map Link

Trail Highlights:

Kid friendly
Hiking
Views
Waterfall
Wildflowers
Wildlife
No dogs

4. Bridal Wreath Falls Trail

5. Petroglyphs at King Canyon

5. Petroglyphs at King Canyon

The Petroglyphs at King Canyon is a 2.2 mile out and back trail and is good for families with older children. The trail is primarily used for hiking, walking, nature trips, and bird watching and is best used from September until May.

The trail spans around 2.2 miles, and it is an out and back trail type. The elevation gain for this trail is 291 feet, and it is located in the west district of Saguaro National Park. This trail is ranked moderate, and it is a good place for hiking, birdwatching, and walking during your visit to Saguaro National Park. If you are a beginner, this is an excellent trail for you while in Saguaro National Park.

Length: 5.7 mi
Elevation Gain: 1,095 ft
Route Type: Out & Back

Interactive Map Link

Trail Highlights:

Kid friendly
Hiking
Nature trips
Walking
Bird watching
Historic site
No dogs

5. Petroglyphs at King Canyon

Paid Accommodations and Dining Near Saguaro National Park

During your visit to Saguaro National Park, here are the places you can dine and stay.

Desert Diamond Casino Hotel is located at 7350 S Nogales Hwy. it is 17.2 miles away from Saguaro National Park

White Stallion Ranch is located 53.0 miles away from Saguaro National Park at 9251 W Twin Peaks Rd.

La Quinta Inn Suites is located 6.1 miles from Saguaro National Park at 6020 W Hospitality Rd.

Red Roof Inn Tucson North – Marana located 6.4 miles away at 4940 W Ina Rd.

Hampton Inn & Suites Tucson Marana is located 6.8 miles at 6300 W Marana Center Blvd.

Saguaro National Park

What to Pack for Your Visit to Saguaro National Park?

If you are an outdoor enthusiast planning an outdoor expedition in Saguaro National Park, here are the gears you should carry along:

Hiking boots. The boots should have good ankle support and be roomy. The boots will help in hiking the wild trails and in keeping your feet comfortable.

Reusable water jug. You will use it to carry water that will keep you hydrated when hiking in Saguaro National Park.

Sunscreen. The weather in Saguaro National Park is scorching, and there are hikes without shelters from the sun.

Light-colored clothing with long pants. This will help in protecting you from the sun and desert insects.

Park map. If you have never been to Saguaro National Park, you should download an offline map to help in direction purposes and prevent you from getting lost.

Quick-dry travel towel. You will use it to wipe sweat and to keep dry.

Breathable hat. This will help in protecting your head from direct UV rays.

Cooling towel. To keep you cool while hiking.

Windproof umbrella. For shelter from rain or direct sun rays

For complete photos and videos of our trip visit our photos on our page Facebook Page

You May Want to Join Our Boondocking Group on Facebook For More Information

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