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14 Free Boondocking Spots Olympic National Park

Olympic National Park Boondocking

Olympic National Park was established on 29th June 1938. In the early 1900s, President Teddy Roosevelt designated part of the Olympic Forest Reserve to form the Mount Olympus National Monument

Introduction: Why Visit the Olympic National Park

Olympic National Park is one of the beautiful and amazing tourist destinations with unique and impressive attractions in the United States and the world. This stunning national park on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula in the Pacific Northwest features hidden gems and memorable spots that visiting will make your trip there worthwhile. The Park is one of the most visited parks in the United States and a unique destination for hikers, adventurers, families and even road trippers. Here are the reasons you should visit Olympic National Park.

1. Size

Olympic National Park covers around 1,442 square miles, making it a significant attraction than even Rhode Island by 200 square miles and over half the size of Delaware. Inside this park, 49 peaks are more than 6,500 feet and more than 600 miles of trails. When driving in this park, it will take you more than a 6-hour continuous drive without any stops.

2. Glaciers

There are more than 266 glaciers spread throughout Olympic National Park that you should visit and see if you are an outdoor enthusiast that loves nature and natural sceneries. Visiting this park will give the opportunity to view the Blue Glacier on Mount Olympus, which is over 2.6 miles long and the size of 20 trillion ice cubes.

3. Animals

Olympic National Park is a large park with beautiful rainforests, great mountain peaks, impressive beaches and even salmon stocked rivers. In addition to all the beautiful things, Olympic National Park is home to the abundant wildlife you will see during your visit. Some animals that call this park home are Roosevelt elk, marmots, slugs, flying squirrels, salamanders, black bears and eagles.

4. Beaches

Olympic National Park is home to some of the best beaches in the world. The beaches in Olympic National Park are full of sea life and are rocky and craggy. The beaches in this park have some fantastic trails for fantastic hiking opportunities on sunny days. You will also get to watch the great storm on rainy days from these beaches. You will also get to watch both gray and Orca whales depending on the season from Olympic National Park beaches.

5. Rainforests

There are several rainforests found in Olympic National Park. Some of the rainforests in this beautiful park include the Hoh Rainforest featuring moss-covered trees, hiking trails, and animals such as bobcats, bears and elk. This rainforest receives more than 120 inches of rainfall yearly; the Queets rainforest, which receives over 140 inches of rainfall annually and it is a great place to visit if you want to spend some time alone in the park since it is less visited; the Quinault Rainforest – this is a great destination to visit if you do not want to avoid the frequent-visited Hoh Rainforest. This rainforest receives over 120 inches of rain yearly, and it is home to black bears, salmon, eagles and stunning waterfalls. You will also find Douglas firs, western red cedar, Sitka spruce and even western hemlock.

6. Lakes, Rivers and Waterfalls

Olympic National Park is home to some of the great rivers, lakes and waterfalls. The rivers in this park you can visit are the Hoh, the Elwha, the Quinault, and the Queets, which support life. The lakes include Lake Crescent and Lake Quinault, where you will find various species of fish. The lakes also have great places for hiking, kayaking and even camping. Some of the most beautiful waterfalls in this park are the 90-foot Marymere Falls and the Olympic Peninsula Waterfall Trail featuring over 20 spectacular waterfalls.

7. Hiking and climbing

More than 600 miles of trails in Olympic National Park, ranging from low land hikes along the beautiful beaches and dense rainforests to summiting isolated peaks that visiting will ensure you stretch your legs fully. Some of the isolated peaks in Olympic National Park offer great views of the park and the surrounding areas.

History of Olympic National Park National Park

Olympic National Park was established on 29th June 1938. In the early 1900s, President Teddy Roosevelt designated part of the Olympic Forest Reserve to form the Mount Olympus National Monument in order to the habitat of the steep declining Roosevelt Elk.

In 1937, President Franklin Roosevelt added his support to the establishment of a national park after visiting the Olympic Peninsula. After one year, he signed an act designating this area to Olympic National Park. In 1953, the Pacific coast was added to Olympic National Park. Prior to this, in time immemorial to the 1800s, the contemporary tribes of the Olympic Peninsula inhabited this area. The eight contemporary tribes are the Makah, Quileute, Hoh, Quinault, Skokomish, Port Gamble S’Klallam, Jamestown S’Klallam and Lower Elwha Klallam. There are more than archaeological sites documenting over 12,000 years of human history in Olympic National Park.

Olympic National Park Boondocking

How to Get to The Olympic National Park

Olympic National Park can be accessed using various means. You can use the following means to get to Olympic National Park.

If you have a car, you can use the I-5 corridor to get to this park or use any quieter state roadways that will take you to the Olympic Peninsula. Once you are at Olympic Peninsula, connect to Hwy 101 to get anywhere in Olympic National Park.

1. If you are using a car and you are in Olympia, you should take I-5, and it will take you to Hwy 101.
2. In Tacoma, you should take State Route 16 to Bremerton and then take on State Route 3 north that will take you to State Route 104 and then to Hwy 101.
3. If you are on Washington/ Oregon Coast, you will connect to Hwy 101 in Aberdeen.

By Ferry. There are multiple routes that The Washington State Ferries System uses that you can use to get to Olympic National Park. Additionally, there are numerous port destinations that you can alight in when boarding a ferry and easily access Olympic National Park.

1. When in Port Townsend, you can use State Route 20 to get to Hwy 101.
2. In Kingston, use State Route 104 to get to Hwy 101.
3. In Bainbridge Island, use State Routes 305,7 and 104 to get to Hwy 101
4. The Hood Canal Bridge is along State Route 104, and the route may be closed periodically for boat traffic.

16 Boondocking Locations Near Olympic National Park

All mileage to center of the park.  The gates and trails you wish to visit are usually less than half of the mileage listed.

1. Olympic National Park Boondocking Locations – 21 Miles: – Hamma Hamma River

Address
Hoodsport, Washington
GPS: 47.59742, -123.17161
Elevation: 728′

Management – Public – Forest Service

The maximum RV length at Hamma Hamma River is 25 feet. After passing the two pay campgrounds, there are a few places to camp before the road turns to gravel. These campsites are dispersed and do not have any facilities. Pack it in -> pack it out. The camping areas are suitable for smaller rigs, truck campers, vans and tents.

Amenities:

Near Water
Pets Welcome

Activities:

RV Parking
Tent Camping
Wildlife Viewing

1 Hamma Hamma River Olympic National Park

2. Olympic National Park Boondocking Hotspots – 21 Miles: – Campbell Tree Grove Campground

Address
Forest Service Road 2204
Montesano, Washington
GPS: 47.4822, -123.68589
Elevation: 1109′

Management
Public – Forest Service (Official)

Campbell Tree Grove Campground is open May to September. There are 16-29 campsites at this location and the maximum RV length is 15 feet. You may stay 14 days at Campbell Tree Grove Campground. The gates for the campground are closed right now, most likely due to COVID and reduced forest services, but there is a second road a bit past the main camp sign that goes down to a additional camping areas. Watch for poison oak. The camp requires a state recreational site pass, I didn’t have one and it worked out okay!

Amenities:

Picnic Tables
Restrooms

Activities:

Fishing
Hiking
Wildlife Viewing

2 Campbell Tree Grove Campground Olympic National Park

3. Olympic National Park Boondocking Locations – 22 Miles: – Wynoochee River – Spot

Address
Montesano, Washington
GPS: 47.445034, -123.552992
Elevation: 860′

Management -Public – Forest Service (Official)

You may stay 14 days at Wynoochee River – Spot. This spot is right next to the river, on a bank above the river, has a great view of the river, and no other camping spots anywhere near it. Some folks might be sensitive to the noise of the river. The spot is also immediately adjacent to the dirt/gravel road which can be busy and noisy and dusty during the summer.

Activities:

RV Parking
Tent Camping
Fishing
Hiking
Wildlife Viewing

4. Olympic National Park Boondocking Hotspots – 23 Miles: – Mount Rose Trailhead

Address
Hoodsport, Washington
GPS: 47.495487, -123.267632
Elevation: 784′

Management – Public – Forest Service (Unofficial)

Headed to the Staircase area of Olympic National Park via N Lake Cushman Rd, you will come across a sign for the Mount Rose Trailhead. The road to the trailhead does have a bit of a pothole issue (i.e. there are about a million potholes!).

Activities:

Boating
Fishing
Hiking
Wildlife Viewing

4 Mount Rose Trailhead Olympic National Park

5. Olympic National Park Boondocking Locations – 24 Miles: – Upper Hoh Road Spots

Address
Forks, Washington
GPS: 47.81644, -124.050245
Elevation: 489′

Management – Public – National Park Service (Unofficial)

Along this road I saw about 6 different cars parked doing dispersed car/tent camping in different areas accessible not far off the road. This is a long road so there are quite a few, but limited spots. I’m not sure if you can do so after the pay to enter station for Olympic National Park (I would ask to make sure if all the other spots are taken), but I did see them before it. There is one pit toilet before that pay station in a brown hut with a small parking lot.

6. Olympic National Park Boondocking Hotspots – 24 Miles: – NF-2419 Dispersed Overlook

Address
Hoodsport, Washington
GPS: 47.50797, -123.21966
Elevation: 1985′

Management- Public – Forest Service (Unofficial)

This site we stayed overnight is waaayy up the mountain! We passed a lot of (small, sloped) pullouts on the way up, but they were all right alongside the road, which isn’t our vibe. We kept going up and up and FINALLY found an actual campsite (2 sister spots, to be precise) set back from the road which was perfect! This ended up being right below (by like 60 yards) the upper Mt. Elinor trailhead — which is helpful if you’re hiking it, and also because there’s a vault toilet there.

Just be aware that if you do drive all the way to the top (doable in any car, it’s wide and maintained by the FS), it’s a long way. Maybe 20-30 mins each way from the bottom, depending on how fast you drive. This site has a gorgeous view of the Mt. Elinor ridgeline, and wide open sky in the other direction. A bit too far back to see much at the bottom, but if you are up high on your rig or something you can spot the lake and city lights.

6 NF-2419 Dispersed Overlook Olympic National Park

7. Olympic National Park Boondocking Locations – 25 Miles: – Satsop Lake

Address
NFD Road 2222
Montesano, Washington
GPS: 47.413205, -123.530915
Elevation: 1575′

Management – Public – Forest Service (Official)

The road in is 4×4 and 5 miles from a paved road. Satsop Lake is open Year round. There are 1-5 campsites at this location. You may stay 21 days at Satsop Lake.

Activities:

Tent Camping
Hiking
Wildlife Viewing

8. Olympic National Park Boondocking Hotspots – 26 Miles: – Hoh River Trust

Address
Forks, Washington
GPS: 47.803744, -124.096882
Elevation: 399′

Management – Public – Hoh River Trust (Official)

The road in is Dirt and 2 miles from a paved road. There are 1-5 campsites at this location. You may stay 7 days at Hoh River Trust.

This area is at the end of a gravel track, known locally as Water Mark Road or Owl Creek Road. Follow Upper Hoh Road east from Hwy 101, around 8 miles, and the road will split at a Y. Take the gravel road to the right, drive to the end, and you’ll find a sign posted on a tree saying that camping is allowed in designated areas. As far as I could tell, the only designated areas were down a rough track to the left. Access for RVs would be very difficult.

8 Hoh River Trust Olympic National Park

9. Olympic National Park Boondocking Locations – 26 Miles: – FS2480 clear cut

Address
Hoodsport, Washington
GPS: 47.539687, -123.093244
Elevation: 869′

Management – Public – State Forest

The road in is Gravel and 3.3 miles from a paved road. There are 1-5 campsites at this location and the maximum RV length is 45 feet. Short spur road dead ending in a couple of year old clear cut. Firm gravel road. View to Hood Canal to the east. Little shade, but lots of room. Plenty of firewood. Sun and moon rises are beautiful. Take Jorsted Creek Rd/FS24 off of US101, bearing right at FS2480, around 3.3 miles. The logged area has been replanted, but the saplings are mostly a foot or less in height.

Activities:

RV Parking
Tent Camping
OHV
Hiking
Hunting

9 FS2480 clear cut

10. Olympic National Park Boondocking Hotspots – 27 Miles: – Morgan’s Crossing

Address
Forks, Washington
GPS: 47.812626, -124.12213
Elevation: 318′

Management – Public – Forest Service

The road in is Dirt and 1000ft miles from a paved road. There are 1-5 campsites at this location and the maximum RV length is 15 feet. Stayed here in a 4-person tent and slept well! Note that it did rain all night but the rain fly kept us dry. We were pleasantly surprised to find a clean vault toilet here, and not a single other person or car in sight!

The only unfortunate part was that it’s close to the Forks Airport so you can hear a fair amount of plane activity overhead. This wasn’t much of an issue except for one occurrence around midnight, when a low-flying plane circled overhead. It was so loud that the ground below us started rumbling!

Amenities:

Restrooms

Activities:

RV Parking
Tent Camping

10 Morgan's Crossing Olympic National Park Boondocking

 

11. Olympic National Park Boondocking Locations – 27 Miles: – Southern Olympic Peninsula, NF-21 (aka Boundary Road), Matheny Creek

Address
Amanda Park, Washington
GPS: 47.571087, -124.037842
Elevation: 581′

Management – Public – Forest Service (Official)

The road in is Paved. There are 1-5 campsites at this location and the maximum RV length is 35 feet. Drive approximately 10.5 miles west of Amanda Park, WA on US-101. You’ll see signs for NF-21. Turn right and continue down the road for 8.0 miles, all paved. You’ll pass a bridge near the 8 mile mark, and the campsite is just past the bridge on the right. It’s a pretty large spot, and larger RVs shouldn’t have a problem maneuvering (we have a 19′ travel trailer and it was super easy).

Activities:

RV Parking
Tent Camping

11 Southern Olympic Peninsula Olympic National Park Boondocking

12. Olympic National Park Boondocking Hotspots – 27 Miles: – NF-012 road

Address
Brinnon, Washington
GPS: 47.639687, -122.975298

Management – Public – Forest Service (Unofficial)

The road in is Gravel and 2 miles from a paved road. You may stay 14 days at NF-012 road. Dead end spot at the end of a road in the national forest. Big enough to turn around and to fit a small RV. Perfectly good spot to camp for a night, woods everywhere, clean site. Didn’t explore much beyond but here were various dirt roads and other pulloffs to check out.

Activities:

RV Parking
Tent Camping
Hiking
Wildlife Viewing

13. Olympic National Park Boondocking Locations – 28 Miles: – NF-011 road near blyn, WA

Address
Sequim, Washington
GPS: 47.997641, -123.014152
Elevation: 732′

Management – Public – Forest Service (Official)

The road in is Dirt and less than 10 miles from a paved road. NF-011 road near blyn, WA is open all year. There are 1-5 campsites at this location and the maximum RV length is 15 feet. You may stay 14 days at NF-011 road near blyn, WA.

Activities:

Tent Camping
Hiking
Wildlife Viewing

14. Olympic National Park Boondocking Hotspots – 28 Miles: – Lyre River DNR

Address
Port Angeles, Washington
GPS: 48.151067, -123.830541
Elevation: 92′

Management
Public – Department of Natural Resources (Official)
The road in is Gravel and .3 miles from a paved road. There are 6-15 campsites at this location and the maximum RV length is 25 feet. You may stay 14 days at Lyre River DNR.

Amenities:

Fire Ring
Near Water
Picnic Tables
Restrooms

Activities:

Fishing
Swimming
Wildlife Viewing

14 Lyre River DNR Olympic National Park Boondocking

The 2 sites below are accessible with a $35 a year Washington State Discover Pass. This $35 provides free camping in over 100 Washington State Parks as well as more than 100 in Oregon. These two are vituall outside of the park

15. Olympic National Park Boondocking Locations – 20 Miles: – Lyre River DNR -A PASS or PERMIT is required at this campsite (SEE ABOVE).

Address
Port Angeles, Washington
GPS: 48.151067, -123.830541
Elevation: 92′

Management – Public – Department of Natural Resources (Official)

The road in is Gravel and .3 miles from a paved road. There are 6-15 campsites at this location and the maximum RV length is 25 feet. You may stay 14 days at Lyre River DNR.

Free!! With discover pass. About 12 spots, usually completely empty. FREE WITH THE DISCOVER PASS – Discover Pass is $10/day or $35/year.

Amenities:

Fire Ring
Near Water
Picnic Tables
Restrooms

Activities:

Fishing
Swimming
Wildlife Viewing

15 Lyre River DNR Olympic National Park Boondocking

16. Olympic National Park Boondocking Locations – 20 Miles: – Sadie Creek Campground – A PASS or PERMIT is required at this campsite (SEE ABOVE).

Address
Port Angeles, Washington
GPS: 48.133869, -123.907423
Elevation: 574′

Management – Public – State Park (Official)

The road in is Dirt and .1 mile miles from a paved road. Sadie Creek Campground is open April 1st – Dec 1st. There are 6-15 campsites at this location and the maximum RV length is 25 feet. You may stay 7 days at Sadie Creek Campground.

Brand new developed campground managed by DNR. Sadie Creek Multi-Use area has provided off-road trails since 1972. 6 official campsites just finished construction 1 week ago mainly for ATV campers, but RVs under 30ft allowed up to 7 days per 30 days with Washington State Discover Pass ($35/Annually) Vault toilet provided, fire rings and picnic tables.

Amenities:

Fire Ring
Near Water
Pets Welcome
Picnic Tables
Restrooms

Activities:

RV Parking
OHV
Biking
Hiking
Hunting
Wildlife Viewing

16 Sadie Creek Campground Olympic National Park Boondocking

Top 6 Places to Visit in Olympic National Park

There are tons of activities and sightseeing in Olympic National Park that visiting will make your trip more fun and memorable either alone, with your partner or with kids. Here are places and things to do and see in Olympic National Park.

1. See Big Trees Covered in Moss

Big Trees Covered in Moss are found in the Hall of Mosses Trail in Hoh Rainforest in Olympic National Park. This rainforest features mosses and fern that cover almost every tree and surface, giving it its lush green wonderland. Additionally, during your visit to this place while in Olympic National Park, you will find towering western redcedars, hemlocks, Douglas Firs, and Sitka Spruces, plus lichen. This Park is home to the biggest and tallest champion trees in the United States that are more than 150 feet. Further, there is an 8-mile loop trail along with the Hall of Mosses suitable for hiking. This is a good place in Olympic National Park to visit with kids.

2. Lake Crescent and Lake Quinault

This beautiful park is home to some beautiful lakes. The two famous lakes in Olympic National Park are Crescent Lake, located on its northern edge, and Lake Quinault, on the southwest corner. These lakes are a great place in Olympic National Park for kayaking, canoeing and even paddleboarding. If you want to get more details about this park, you can take a narrated scenic cruise. There are great spots for hiking, boating, and even camping in and around these two lakes.
Some of the fish species found in these two lakes are the Beardslee and the Crescenti trout.

3. Beaches

The beaches in Olympic National Park are always too cold and too wet for swimming and even sunbathing. However, there are other activities that you can do on the beaches in this fantastic park. Some of the beaches in Olympic National Park include Mora and Rialto Beach, Kalaloch and Ruby Beach, Shi Shi Beach, and many more. Additionally, the Pacific coast part of this park is quite rugged, and it is stunningly beautiful. There are sculptured sea stacks, tide pools, high bluffs, wildlife and stunning ocean views that you can have while on the beaches in this park. Whale-watching is one of the things you can do on any of the beaches in this park. There are fine hiking and camping spots too along the beaches in this park.

4. Natural Hot Pools

This national park is known to have cold temperatures. However, there are natural pools in Olympic National Park at Sol Duc Hot Springs Resort that you can visit after a long day hiking in the cold or rain to relax your muscles. This Park features three mineral hot springs pools with temperatures 99F to 104F plus a freshwater pool.

5. High Steel Bridge

This bridge is one of the amazing spots in Olympic National Park that you should never fail to visit. The bridge is 427 feet about the South Skokomish River, and it offers one of the fantastic views of the park. You can access this bridge by car. While on this bridge, you will be able to have stunning views of blue water in the gorge below and even the waterfall.

6. Hurricane Ridge

The Hurricane Ridge is an excellent spot in Olympic National Park to visit to have panoramic views of the Olympic Mountain range and the surrounding areas. Additionally, there are multiple trails for hiking that you can easily access from Hurricane Ridge. Common activities around this ridge are hiking, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing and sledding, and many more.

Typical activities in Olympic National Park include; boating, fishing, tide-pooling, camping, backpacking, day hiking, wildlife viewing, birdwatching, hiking, skiing, snowshoeing and even sledding.

The sightseeing include; Quinault River, Enchanted Valley, Hoh Rainforest, Hall of Mosses, Rialto Beach, Coastal wilderness, Lake Crescent, Olympic Mountains, Hurricane Ridge, Olympic National Forest, and Sol Duc Springs and falls, Marymere Falls, Staircase Rapids Loop and many more.

Olympic National Park Boondocking

8 Great Trails to Hike at Olympic National Park

Olympic National Park is an excellent destination with more than 600 miles of trails that you can use for hiking. Here are the best spots in Olympic National Park that are suitable for hiking.

1. Hurricane Hill Trail

1. Hurricane Hill Trail-1 Olympic National Park

This is one top trail in Olympic National Park that you can use for hiking. The trail spans around 3.2 miles, and it has an elevation gain of 650 feet. Additionally, the difficulty level is medium, and it is an out and back type of trail. Along this trail, there are expansive views out onto majestic mountains. Along the trail, you will find open pine forests and short shrubs. You will also have breathtaking views of the snow-covered peak of Mount Baker, Victoria, BC and even the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

The trail was not maintained, at least 20+ blowdowns and had to bushwhack through devil’s club and ferns for the first 5 miles. As the other reviews said, the road is out so you have to take the bypass trail and so it’s a 3 mile walk from the parking lot to the start of the actual trail. Once you get above the tree line the trail disappears for a bit and you just have to hike up the hill until you find the switchbacks 100 yds up the hill. GPS is necessary for this, the trail markings on the GPS were reliable. Once you get on the ridge line there are beautiful views and easy to follow trail until about 1 mile from Hurricane Hill where the snow began.

Length: 10.9 mi
Elevation gain:5,328 ft
Route type: Out & back

Interactive Map https://www.alltrails.com/trail/us/washington/hurricane-hill–6

Hiking
Forest
Views
Wildflowers
Wildlife
Fee
No dogs

1. Hurricane Hill Trail-1 Olympic National Park

2. Sunrise Ridge & Mt. Angeles

2. Sunrise Ridge & Mt. Angeles-1 Olympic National Park

This fantastic trail spans around 6.3 miles, and it has an elevation gain of 1,254 feet. The trail is suitable for out and back hiking style, and its difficulty level is complex and therefore only suitable for experienced hikers. This trail starts at the Hurricane Ridge Visitors center, where you will pass along the paved High Ridge Nature Trail with beautiful wildflowers. The trail gets steep along the ridge. You will be able to have fantastic views of the Puget Sound and Olympic mountains while hiking on this trail.

Glad we hiked the trail on a clear day. Panoramic! Starting at the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center parking lot, we took the up and down route along the ridge all the way to the fork in the trail heading to Klahane Ridge off to the right. We elected to hike about 15 minutes up the steep incline towards the Mount Angeles peak. We stopped at a clearing where we had lunch and enjoyed the sweeping views of the park skyline. We didn’t have time to summit which was disappointing. It did look very steep as other reviewers posted. The hike back was just as rewarding since the views are constant wherever you look, either south into the park or north towards Port Angeles and Canada.

Length: 5.5 mi
Elevation gain: 2,017 ft
Route type: Out & back

Interactive Map https://www.alltrails.com/trail/us/washington/sunrise-ridge-trail-to-mount-angeles

Hiking
Snowshoeing
Forest
River
Views
Wildflowers
Wildlife
Rocky
Scramble
Fee
No dogs

2. Sunrise Ridge & Mt. Angeles-1 Olympic National Park

3. Klahhane Ridge to Lake Angeles

3. Klahhane Ridge to Lake Angeles-1 Olympic National Park

This is one of the best trails in Olympic National Park that span 12.4 miles with an elevation gain of 2,350 feet. Hiking in this trail is quite strenuous and suitable for only experienced hikers, plus it is a loop type trail. Hiking in this trail starts at Klahhane Ridge, and you will then head to Lake Angeles; along the trail, it narrows, and you will find steep ascent and switchbacks that will take you through sub-alpine forests. You will see wildlife such as mountain goats, black bears and deer while hiking along this trail. During the summer, there are beautiful wildflowers along this trail in Olympic National Park.

Absolutely beautiful! Unbeatable panoramic views. We started at the switchback trailhead and ended right before the descent to the lake, which put us at about 5.5 miles roundtrip. Took us just under 4.5 hours not counting a lunch break at the top. Tough but definitely doable with water and breaks (from a mid 20s gal in moderate-ish shape). Hiking poles were a great addition!

Someone below commented on the road being visible — don’t let that stop you. This isn’t one of those hikes where you end up next to/heading a road. It’s more like “oh my god, look there’s the road down there, I can’t believe we’ve gone that far!”

Length: 12.6 mi
Elevation gain: 4,514 ft
Route type: Out & back

Interactive Map https://www.alltrails.com/trail/us/washington/klahhane-ridge-trail-to-lake-angeles

Hiking
Horseback riding
Running
Lake
Views
Wildflowers
Wildlife
Rocky
Fee
No dogs

3. Klahhane Ridge to Lake Angeles-1 Olympic National Park

4. Mt. Storm King

4. Mt. Storm King-1 Olympic National Park

If you want to get a million-dollar view while in Olympic National Park, then this trail is the best for hiking. The trail spans around 4 miles, and it has an elevation gain of 2,065 feet. The hike style is out and back, and it is a bit hard to hike and therefore ideal for experienced hikers. The trail starts at Storm King Ranger Station, passing through Highway 101, and it passes through forests. There are great spots along this trail for amazing views of Lake Crescent and surrounding areas. It is advisable to visit this trail during the rainy seasons.

Length: 5.3 mi
Elevation gain: 2,076 ft
Route type: Out & back

Waypoints:

1. Juunction to Marymere Falls and Barnes Creek Trail

48.05351, -123.79028

2. Crescent Lake Viewpoint
48.05536, -123.77901

3. End of maintained trail
48.05501, -123.77616

Interactive Map https://www.alltrails.com/trail/us/washington/mount-storm-king

Hiking
Forest
Lake
River
Views
Wildflowers
Wildlife
Rocky
Scramble
Fee
No dogs

4. Mt. Storm King-1 Olympic National Park

5. Marymere Falls

5. Marymere Falls-1 Olympic National Park Boondocking

This is an easy-going trail and suitable for all levels of hikers. The trail spans around 1.8 miles with an elevation gain of 500 feet. It is an out and back trail type. This trail is not far from Lake Crescent, and while hiking, you will have fantastic views of Marymere falls. Hiking on this trail starts at Storm King Ranger Station, and it goes through towering old-growth forest and a flowing stream that feature all sorts of Jurassic-Park-Looking ferns and mosses. It then ascends slightly up a ravine, and it ends at the 90-foot waterfall.

The trail itself is easy for the most part with a couple of steep inclines/stairs right around the falls. We saw lots of older people and families with children. Also saw some people with a small dog off leash when there were signs saying no pets allowed!! Please read park rules

Length: 1.7 mi
Elevation gain: 298 ft
Route type: Out & back

Interactive Map https://www.alltrails.com/trail/us/washington/marymere-falls-trail

Kid friendly
Hiking
Running
Forest
Lake
River
Views
Waterfall
Wildflowers
Wildlife
Fee
No dogs

5. Marymere Falls-1 Olympic National Park Boondocking

6. Sol Duc Falls Trail

6. Sol Duc Falls Trail-1 Olympic National Park Boondocking

This is one of the easy and relaxing hiking trails in Olympic National Park and, therefore, perfect for people of all ages. The trail spans around 1.6 miles, and it is an out and back trail. The elevation gain of this trail is 200 feet. The trail starts in a vast and well-maintained area that is surrounded by a dense rainforest canopy. It then goes towards the Sol Duc Falls. There are great spots offering spectacular views of the waterfalls along this trail.

Length: 1.6 mi
Elevation gain: 226 ft
Route type: Out & back

Waypoints

1. Trail Junction
An intersection with paths leading either back to the trailhead parking lot or the Sol Duc campground.
47.9535231, -123.8330174

2. Trail Junction
A junction with access to Sol Duc Falls, Lover’s Lane, Deer Lake, Seven Lakes, and Basin Loop trails.
47.9521537, -123.8208223

3. Canyon Creek Shelter
A small log shelter built in 1939 by Civilian Conservation Corps enrollees. Unfortunately it has seen heavy damage by budding graffiti artists. See pictures for more details.
47.95215, -123.82042

4. Sol Duc Falls
Three rapid shoots fall about 15 feet over a sheer rock wall. Numerous vantage points allow for many tourists to view at one time.
47.9517774, -123.8195856

Interactive Map https://www.alltrails.com/trail/us/washington/sol-duc-falls-nature-trail

Kid friendly
Backpacking
Camping
Hiking
Walking
Running
Forest
Lake
River
Views
Waterfall
Wildflowers
Wildlife
Fee
No dogs

6. Sol Duc Falls Trail-1 Olympic National Park Boondocking

7. Second Beach

7. Second Beach-1 Olympic National Park Boondocking

This is an out-and-back trail that spans around 4 miles with an elevation gain of 310 feet. Persons of all ages can use this trail for hiking. This trail starts at the parking lot near the town of La Push, going downhill towards the hurricane fence. There is a moss-covered kiosk with trees growing on it along this trail. While hiking along this trail, you will have fine views of the peak Pacific Northwest.

Walking through the forest to get to the beach was a great surprise as it was so peaceful. After descending many steps the vast ocean appears along with a very long sandy beach. A wonderful easy stroll was so refreshing and relaxing. Many backpackers had set up tents along the shore. Very peaceful. I highly recommend this one!

Length: 2.1 mi
Elevation gain: 278 ft
Route type: Out & back

Interactive Map https://www.alltrails.com/trail/us/washington/second-beach-trail–3

Kid friendly
Backpacking
Camping
Hiking
Beach
Forest
Views
Wildlife
No dogs

7. Second Beach-1 Olympic National Park Boondocking

8. Hall of Moss

8. Hall of Moss-1 Olympic National Park Boondocking

This is one of the most visited trails in Olympic National Park, and it is one of the hiking trails suitable for all ages. The trail stretches around 0.8 miles, and it has an elevation gain of 100 feet plus; it is a loop hike style. The trail is well-maintained. You will be able to see wildlife such as elk and banana slugs when hiking along this trail.

It’s not too difficult of a trail, there are some steep parts, but nothing slippery or tricky. There are a ton of offshoot trails that look like they should be navigable, but the forest service was out in force making sure people stayed on the original wider trail. All in all, it is a beautiful trail!

Length: 1.1 mi
Elevation gain: 78 ft
Route type: Loop

Waypoints

1. Maple Grove
47.86329, -123.93352

Interactive Map https://www.alltrails.com/trail/us/washington/hoh-rain-forest-hall-of-moss

Kid friendly
Camping
Hiking
Walking
Forest
Partially paved
Views
Wildflowers
Wildlife
Rocky
Fee
No dogs

8. Hall of Moss Olympic National Park Boondocking

Paid Accommodations and Dining Near Olympic National Park National Park

1. While visiting Olympic National Park, here are the places you can stay and dine
2. Log Cabin Resort is located at 3183 East Beach Road in Olympic National Park.
3. Quinault Lodge is located at 345 South Shore Road, Quinault.
4. Sol Duc Hot Springs Resort along Sol Duc Road.
5. Kalaloch Lodge is located at 157151 Highway 101, Forks.
6. Quileute Oceanside Resort
7. Quillayute River Resort

Olympic National Park Boondocking

10. What to Pack for Your Visit to Olympic National Park

Here are the gears that you should bring with you if you are an outdoor enthusiast and planning for an outdoor expedition in Olympic National Park.

Rain jacket. You will use it for protection from drizzles and downpours while in the Pacific Northwest in Olympic National Park.

Park maps. You should download or have a detailed map while touring Olympic National Park to help in direction purposes, save you time, and prevent you from getting lost.

Tide Chart, Topographic map and watch. These gears will help you if you are planning to explore the coastline and the tide pools.

Sturdy, hard-soled water shoes. This will help your feet from getting hurt by sharp rocks and barnacles in Olympic National Park.

Hiking boots. The boots should have traction. The boots will help in keeping your feet dry and comfortable when hiking.

Binoculars. Olympic National Park is full of animal life. This gear will help you have excellent views of whales, seals, bald eagles and other animals while in the park.

Water bottles or hydration system. Although Olympic National Park tends to be wet while exploring the park, you may get dehydrated, and this may help prevent any headaches and severe conditions like heat cramps and heatstroke.

Headlamp. For easy visibility at night

Sunglass and sun hat. For protection against direct sunlight

For complete photos and videos of our trip visit our photos on our page Facebook Page

You May Want to Join Our Facebook Group Boondocking Group on Facebook For More Information

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