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14 Great Oregon Boondocking Areas With Maps

Oregon Boondocking Areas

Oregon boondocking areas are always near wagon ruts from the Oregon Trail, colorful prehistoric fossil beds, and creepy ghost towns that provide a dose of history. And those are only the beginning of all the dispersed campsites in Oregon.

These Boondocking Locations are concentrated in the South East part of Oregon
Links to more Free Campsites, in other sections of Oregon, are listed below

Oregon Boondocking Areas

Some of the most incredible spots to see in the Pacific Northwest may be found in Oregon. Fortunately for campers, Oregon has some fantastic free camping locations. Some of Oregon’s best camping may be done for free.

During peak seasons, there are many campground alternatives, but they fill up quickly, and packed campgrounds usually mean noisy campgrounds. Free campgrounds and dispersed campsites in Oregon are some of the best places to stay. They are usually the most difficult to locate and are only known by locals.

There is something to do in every season, from the Oregon coast to the volcanic mountains. It has a lot of wildness and interesting locations to visit.

Other North West U.S. States – Free Boondocking, RV Parking & Camping Spots

54 Free Oregon Boondocking Locations With Maps – North East Section
104 Free Boondocking Spots in Oregon With Maps – North West Section
14 Great Oregon Boondocking Areas With Maps – South East Section
66 Free Central Idaho Boondocking – RV Parking & Camping Spots
78 Free Northern Idaho Boondocking – Camping & RV Parking
60 Free SE Idaho Boondocking – RV Parking & Camping Sites
40 Free SW Idaho Boondocking – RV Parking & Camping
38 Free Boondocking Locations in Wyoming With Maps – North East Section
49 Free Wyoming Boondocking Campsites With Maps – North West Section
44 Free Boondocking Campsites In Wyoming With Maps – South East Section
66 Free Boondocking Spots in Wyoming With Maps – South West Section

14 Great Oregon Boondocking Areas With Maps

1. Sagehen Hill Rd

Address
Hines, Oregon
GPS: 43.581839, -119.308147

Management: Public – Bureau of Land Management (Official)

The road in is Gravel and 4 miles from a paved road. Dispersed campsites in Oregon Sagehen Hill Rd is open year round. There are 1-5 Oregon boondocking areas at this location and the maximum RV length is 35 feet. You may stay 2weeks at Sagehen Hill Rd. 4 miles on gravel/dirt road north of highway 20 on BLM.Very flat spot with a fire ring. Nice view of sunset and sunrise. The grade on the road is very mild. We heard coyotes and elk.

2. Stinkwater Pass

Address
Burns, Oregon
GPS: 43.679725, -118.535697
Elevation: 4816′

Management: Public – Bureau of Land Management (Official)

Dispersed campsites in Oregon on BLM land close to Burns, OR. When traveling east on 20, you will see the roadside camp option once the road begins to go up the mountains. At the top of the pass (Stinkwater – apparently after rotting salmon when they used to get this far into OR), the road will be gravel with a cattle guard on the south side.

3. Riverside

Address
Riverside, Oregon
GPS: 43.55374, -118.16491
Elevation: 3268′

Management: Public – Bureau of Land Management (Official)

The road in is Gravel and 17.5 miles from a paved road. Riverside is open year round. There are 1-5 Oregon boondocking areas at this location and the maximum RV length is 25 feet. You may stay 14 days at Riverside. Small primative BLM campground. This is a good all-weather gravel road, albeit washboarded at times. Has a vault toilet,two sites with picnic tables. Dispersed campsites in Oregon right on the Malheur River.

4. – Succor Creek SNA

Address
Antelope Spring Road
Jordan Valley, Oregon
GPS: 43.453831, -117.119711
Elevation: 2838′

Management: Public – State Park (Official)

Very scenic campsite with around 20 dispersed campsites in Oregon and one pit toilet. No water other than Succor Creek running through the camp. 1 pit toilet, fire rings, and very spacious. When I was there I had the whole place to myself, and saw one camper, and someone on a 4 wheeler drive by. The flies were horrible when I was there.

5. Slocum Creek Campground

Address
Jordan Valley, Oregon
GPS: 43.321829, -117.322621
Elevation: 2736′

Management: Public – Bureau of Land Management (Official)

Slocum Creek Campground is open 3/07 – 11/15. There are 6-15 Oregon boondocking areas at this location. You may stay 14 days at Slocum Creek Campground. Slocum Creek campground has 12 Dispersed campsites in Oregon and Picnic tables are also available. A concrete boat ramp provides Owyhee Reservoir access for small water craft. Hiking, photography, plant and wildlife viewing are all popular ctivities in this unique canyon setting. Take caution and be prepared for ticks, rattlesnakes, and extreme weather conditions.

6. Birch Creek Historic Ranch

Address
Birch Creek Road
Jordan Valley, Oregon
GPS: 43.228855, -117.498352
Elevation: 2703′

Management: Public – Bureau of Land Management

Birch Creek Historic Ranch is open Mar-Oct. Dispersed campsites in Oregon located within the Bureau of Land Management Malheur District.

7. Lilly Lake Primitive Campground

Address
Princeton, Oregon
GPS: 42.745254, -118.663815
Elevation: 7297′

Management: Public – Bureau of Land Management (Official)

The road in is Dirt. Lilly Lake Primitive Campground is open weather permitting. There are 6-15 Oregon boondocking areas at this location. You may stay 14 days in the dispersed campsites in Oregon at Lilly Lake Primitive Campground. Picnic tables and a fire ring.

8. Mann Lake RA

Address
Fields-Denio Road
Diamond, Oregon
GPS: 42.777964, -118.438761
Elevation: 4213′

Management: Public – Bureau of Land Management

Dispersed campsites in Oregon located within the Bureau of Land Management Andrews District.

9. – Lilly Lake Primitive Campground

Address
Princeton, Oregon
GPS: 42.745254, -118.663815
Elevation: 7297′

Management: Public – Bureau of Land Management (Official)

The road in is Dirt. Dispersed campsites in Oregon Lilly Lake Primitive Campground is open weather permitting. There are 6-15 Oregon boondocking areas at this location. You may stay 14 days at Lilly Lake Primitive Campground. Picnic tables and a fire ring. 7200 foot elevation.

10. Alford Desert

Address
Fields-Denio Road
Princeton, Oregon
GPS: 42.508082, -118.532403
Elevation: 4029′

Management: Public – Bureau of Land Management

Free Dispersed camping in the Bureau of Land Management Andrews District. First come -> first served. No reservations accepted. Dispersed campsites in Oregon located on BLM land. The Alvord Hot Springs manager was kind enough to let us use his private road to have access to the desert. We camped a few yards south of it near 2 planes.

11. Willow Creek Spring

Address
Unnamed Road
Fields, Oregon
GPS: 42.275267, -118.265462
Elevation: 4521′

Management: Public – Bureau of Land Management

Free dispersed campsites in Oregon in the Bureau of Land Management Jordan District. First come -> first camped. Oregon boondocking areas – No reservations are accepted. It’s not on an unnamed road. It’s the Whitehorse Ranch Road, a gravel road that stretches across two counties. The eastern half of the road (from US Hwy 95) is in Malhuer County and is fairly smooth. The western half (coming in from Fields) is in Harney County and not as well maintained. The westernmost 14 miles are the worst, with serious washboarding that will keep you under 20 mph.

12. Antelope Reservoir Campground

Address
Jordan Valley, Oregon
GPS: 42.914822, -117.242052
Elevation: 4370′

Management: Public (Official)

Dispersed campsites in Oregon Antelope Reservoir and its associated campground are owned and operated by the Bureau of Land Management. Although Antelope Reservoir isn’t near any tourist attractions and the nearest town (Jordan Valley) has a population of just 230 people, its a great place to unwind without the crowds at many State Parks. The dispersed campsites in Oregon are both RV camping and tent camping friendly.

13. Rome Launch Site

Address
3756 Ion Highway, Jordan Valley, Oregon 97910
Jordan Valley, Oregon
GPS: 42.839967, -117.622134
Elevation: 3395′

Management: Public – Bureau of Land Management

The road in is Gravel and .2 miles from a paved road. There are 1-5 Oregon boondocking areas at this location. The sites edge an open, gravel plateau above the Owyhee River. A sagegrass hillside and rocky crest overlook the camp, and planted cottonwoods provide a bit of shade. A nearby attraction is the Pillars of Rome. These 100-foot-tall white rock towers suggested the ruins of Rome to early travelers.

14. – Dispersed Camp: West of Rome

Address
Jordan Valley, Oregon
GPS: 42.821554, -117.710387
Elevation: 3694′

Management: Public – Bureau of Land Management (Unofficial)

The road in is Gravel and .25 miles from a paved road. Dispersed campsites in Oregon West of Rome is open Always. The maximum RV length at Dispersed Camp: West of Rome is unlimited. You may stay 14 days at Dispersed Camp. Camp is on an unnamed gravel road leading between Hwy 95 (ION Hwy) and Kiger Rd (note: do not follow this road to Pillars of Rome unless you have a high-clearance vehicle. Drive Hwy 95 to Rome instead, then follow signs.) Dispersed campsites in Oregon at West of Rome.



Locating Dispersed Campsites in Oregon

Finding free camping in Oregon isn’t difficult if you’re ready to forego conveniences like sewer, water, and electric hookups. Because public lands make up over 60% of the state, Oregon is one of the easiest states to find free dispersed campsites in Oregon. The cost of an RV park varies depending on its location and amenities. Free camping in Oregon is a fantastic way to save money while also avoiding the crowds.

Boondocking is a term for free camping without facilities. Boondocking is permitted on most public lands by the United States Bureau of Land Management (BLM), as long as it does not interfere with other legal uses or is not specifically prohibited. Most secondary roads on BLM land have campgrounds, but they aren’t always designated. The time you can spend on public land is normally limited to 14 days.

When boondocking in Oregon, keep in mind that you’ll need lots of fresh water in your water tank, food, and a way to power your RV. Check your camping checklist several times to ensure you have everything you’ll need while away from civilization.

There are a number of dispersed campsites in Orebon that are available, including some in the woods and others on the water. So, whatever activities you want to do while RVing in Oregon, there are plenty of fantastic free campgrounds to pick from.

Eastern Oregon: Welcome to the Wild West’s part of Oregon

The scenery is claimed by wide-open skies, sagebrush plains, and rocky mountain ranges out here. It’s totally up to you how you use this large outdoor playground: ski down isolated slopes, fish for ravenous steelhead, or simply watch animals pass by. In cowboy country, earn that substantial lunch, and don’t forget the artisan beer.

Dispersed Campsites in Oregon Parks, Forests, and Wildlife Areas

Nothing compares to the great outdoors, and the ‘Beaver State’ has plenty that can be used for dispersed campsites in Oregon. This Pacific Northwest State is home to 11 national forests, 21 national wildlife refuges, 361 state parks, a National Scenic Area, and a national grassland, to name a few.

It may be tough to decide which of the numerous pure and wild locations to visit. Allow us to assist you in locating Oregon boondocking areas. Whether you want to walk through a historic forest, a country of lava rocks, agate-strewn beaches, or a calm wildlife refuge, Oregon has it all.

State Parks in Oregon

Every one of our Oregon state parks is a unique location where people come to play, eat, camp, rest, hike, refresh, and do anything else. They serve as a constant reminder of what makes Oregon great, and their very presence demonstrates what we value as a state.

Oregon Boondocking Areas Without A Reservation

More than 50 dispersed campsites in Oregon are available in State Parks. While the majority of campgrounds accept reservations, some campgrounds operate on a first-come, first-served basis year-round or seasonally.

Camping is first-come, first-served.

Here’s a list of campgrounds where you can camp first-come, first-served:

Southern Oregon

Jackson Kimball
Goose Lake

Central/Eastern Oregon

Bates
Catherine Creek
Clyde Holliday
Cottonwood Canyon (first-come, first-served November – March. Lone Tree Loop campsites and End of the Road Group Camp reservable April-October)
The Cove Palisades (some first-come, dispersed campsites in Oregon in spring and fall)
Emigrant Springs (mix of first-come, first-served and reservable sites
Farewell Bend (A Loop first-come, first-served. B and C Loops reservable)
Hilgard Junction 
Jasper Point Campground at Prineville Reservoir
Lake Owyhee (mix of first-come, first-served and reservable sites)
Minam
Red Bridge
Smith Rock (special walk-in bivouac camping)
Ukiah-Dale
Unity Lake



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