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12 Grand Teton National Park Free Campsites (Updated 2022)

Be ready to be amazed when you try any or all of the 12 Great Grand Teton National Park Free Campsites. Each has so much to offer try more than 1.

The Grand Teton National Park is an American National park located North of Jackson, Wyoming. The park is approximately 310,000 acres. The park boasts fascinating features including stunning landscape, piedmont lakes, Knife-like ridges, moraines, U-shaped canyons, and diverse wildlife. Additionally, the park includes major peaks of the 64 kilometers long Teton Range and the Jackson Hole. Teton National Park is 10 miles south of Yellowstone National Park.

History of the Grand Teton National Park National Park

The amazing beauty, as well as the abundant wildlife and plants found in the Grand Teton National Park, have drawn people here for more than 11,000 years. The Nomadic Paleo-Indians first accessed or rather entered the Jackson Hole valley after the Pleistocene Ice Age glaciers retreated. Summer was a time of plenty and abundance and the Indians came to harvest berries and bulbs.


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The first Euro-American explorer to enter this place was John Colter but did not leave any records of his journey. People also visited this place for wealth. Development started to crowd the Jackson Hole as tourism increased. In 1926 John D. Rockefeller visited the area and fell in love with the stunning mountain scenery and began buying land in the valley with the intent of donating it to the federal government to be the Grand Teton National Park.

It took many years to establish the park. In 1929, Congress created the original park to protect the Teton Range and other lakes at the bottom of the mountains. In 1943, Franklin D. Roosevelt announced the additional land in the valley to be the Jackson Hole Monument. Rockefeller donated the land he had purchased to the federal government to be included in the national park. In 1950, Congress joined the original park, the Rockefeller land, and the national monument to form the current Grand Teton National Park.

Great Grand Teton National Park Free Campsites

12 Great Grand Teton National Park Free Campsites



1. Grand Teton National Park Free Campsites – Jackson Hole Grand Teton Natl Park

Address
Moran, Wyoming
GPS: 43.763874, -110.556709
Elevation: 6976′

Management: Forest Service (USDA)

The road in is Gravel and a couple miles from a paved road. Jackson Hole Grand Teton Natl Park is open Access Mid June to Mid Sept only due to snow/mud. There are 6-15 campsites at this location.

Best Review:

Beautiful spot right in the heart of the Tetons! There is plenty of parking and it was not too bad to get our rig there. Take it slow on the road if you have a bigger rig and its still no problem! Lots of places to park near the camping sign that gives you details about the spot and rules that is only about a mile up from the main road. There are more spots further up in the woods but we only walked there. Great place to go for a hike right from the campsite! Very quiet and great views of the entire valley!

2. Grand Teton National Park Free Campsites – Upper Teton View

Address
Moose, WY 83012
Jenny Lake, Wyoming
GPS: 43.7638, -110.5538
Elevation: 7178′

Management: Forest Service

We first drove into the Lower Teton View camping area and questioned whether we should continue to Upper Teton View with our 28ft travel trailer. We finally decided to unhitch and assess the road and the spots available up top which was one of the best decisions we made on our 14 month road trip. The road access wasn’t too bad AND the spot right next to the cliff was wide open!

Best Review:

This place was amazing. Amazing views of the mountains. Fire pits. No bathrooms. Came here because the shadow mountain campsite was full. This place was also packed, we got the last spot here. Stayed here with a tent and would most definitely stay here again. Very little cell service depending on where you stand

3. Grand Teton National Park Free Campsites – Shadow Mountain

Address
Shadow Mountain Road
Moose, Wyoming
GPS: 43.703621, -110.622757
Elevation: 6794′

Management: Forest Service (USDA)

The road in is Dirt and 1.5 miles from a paved road. You may stay 5 days at Shadow Mountain.

Best Review:

Overall, great campsite. Beautiful views all around, super clean bathrooms, and plenty of campers to make you feel safe if you are a solo female traveler (like us). We had to get there at around 2 on a Tuesday to find a campsite and it was the last one so definitely get there early. Service goes in and out throughout the day but better than nothing. No complaints!

4. Grand Teton National Park Free Campsites – Spread Creek Meadows

Address
Moran, Wyoming
GPS: 43.77165, -110.48816
Elevation: 7119′

Management: Forest Service

The road in is Gravel and About 4 miles from a paved road. Spread Creek Meadows is open May to November. There are 6-15 campsites at this location and the maximum RV length is unlimited. You may stay 16 days at Spread Creek Meadows.

Best Review:

Stayed here beginning July 1st on a cross-country trip from PA and we loved it! I believe it was Site #5 on the right side of the loop once you get back there. Road was fine to travel in my 2wd vehicle. Super close and accessible to everything that you’d want to do at the Tetons. Litter wasn’t too bad, the sites are roomy if people give you some breathing space. We had someone park at our site overnight while we were sleeping and then leave the next morning. It’s always a bad idea to be looking for your free camping spot later than 4:00pm, in my opinion. So get here early.

We heard elk almost every night on the ridge behind us and in the morning, one or two would sometimes pass our campsite. We also saw some on the drive in after watching the sunset. Storms blow up easily, so don’t leave your tent without a rain fly even if it looks clear out. The mosquitos and flies were pretty horrendous, especially towards night time. But honestly, we experienced even worse attacks later on in Yellowstone and Washington so I would just remember bug spray and, if you can, a bug-tent if you’re cooking.
As always, have bear spray and lock up your food. I got 3 bars of service in certain spots but not reliably.

5. Grand Teton National Park Free Campsites – Pacific Creek Road Campsites

Address
Moran, Wyoming
GPS: 43.924333, -110.462694
Elevation: 6972′

Management: Forest Service

The road in is Dirt. There are 6-15 campsites at this location. Free Campsites before you reach the Pacific Creek Campground. Each campsite has a number on a brown plate. 1-3 are grouped together, 4 & 5 were separate, then 6, 7 and 8 are grouped together. No toilet, trash, or water provided. Campfire rings made of rocks.

Best Review:

The coordinates on this website are accurate and took us to campground 5. We went at the end of October and there was no one around ! Hard to find dry firewood, so bring your own is my suggestion. Beautiful place and perfect location to camp before a day at Yellowstone!

6. Grand Teton National Park Free Campsites – Dispersed Site in Bridger Teton National Forest FR 30160

Address
Moran, Wyoming
GPS: 43.81969, -110.373748
Elevation: 7058′

Management: Forest Service

The road in is Gravel and 1-10 miles depending on the site miles from a paved road.

Best Review:

Stayed here for 2 nights. Got there right around sunset and drove pretty far up the road to check out all the spots. As far as I can tell there are only 3 or 4 spots with views of the Tetons, and they fill up quick. My second night I was able to snag one and it was great! ATT service was pretty spotty. I mostly didn’t have service except for rare spots where I would have 1 or 2 bars of 3G. This site is super close to the Tetons, so it’s a great place to stay while visiting the park!

7. Grand Teton National Park Free Campsites – Leidy Lake Access

Address
Forest Road 30250
Jackson, Wyoming
GPS: 43.718971, -110.376462
Elevation: 8734′

Management: State Park

This is a free dispersed campsite. First come -> first served. No reservations accepted. This is a high elevation location.

Best Review:

Very rough and often washed out road. No trailers! Very active grizzly bear area. Don’t mean to scare you, but take “precautions”!

8. Grand Teton National Park Free Campsites – Teton Canyon

Address
Alta, Wyoming
GPS: 43.755969, -110.964317
Elevation: 6796′

Management: Forest Service

The road in is Gravel. Teton Canyon is open Late Spring to Mid- Fall. There are 16-29 campsites at this location. You may stay 14 days at Teton Canyon. Dispersed free camping off of Teton Canyon Road along Teton Creek near Alta, Wyoming. Teton canyon road is off the road that goes to Grand Targhee Ski Resort.

Best Review:

Some nice tucked away sites along Teton Creek. The further you go down Teton Canyon Road, the better. There is a heard of cows that roams the area, and they can get pretty loud at times. It’s easily passable in a sedan. Some of the pullouts are a little rough, so just make sure you give them a quick look before pulling down one. I had no problem finding a site on a Monday and Wednesday night. The trailhead is fairly popular for how remote it is, so you’ll be hearing cars/trucks pull down Teton Canyon Road quite often. No views from the sites themselves, but there is a solid viewpoint up the hill with cell service, as well.

9. Grand Teton National Park Free Campsites – National Elk Refuge – Flat Creek Rd.

Address
675 E. Broadway, 83001
Kelly, Wyoming
GPS: 43.55771, -110.61991
Elevation: 6837′

Management: Forest Service

The road in is 4×4. National Elk Refuge – Flat Creek Rd. is open May – November. There are 6-15 campsites at this location and the maximum RV length is unlimited. You may stay 14 days at National Elk Refuge – Flat Creek Rd.

Best Review:

Great campsite if others nearby are full. Arrived to where the coordinates are to find many cars parked camping in a little parking area, but if you keep going on the road there are 8 or so campsites down a 4WD dirt road. And the first campsite there was no one there and we arrived at around 11 PM.

10. Grand Teton National Park Free Campsites – Gros Ventre, Jackson Hole, Grand Teton NP

Address
Gros Ventre River Road
Kelly, Wyoming
GPS: 43.609901, -110.430893
Elevation: 7037′

Management: Forest Service (USDA)

The road in is Gravel and 2 to 30 miles from a paved road. Gros Ventre, Jackson Hole, Grand Teton NP is open June -Oct. There are 30 or more campsites at this location. You may stay 7 days, but Ck locally at Gros Ventre, Jackson Hole, Grand Teton NP.

Best Review:

There are some terrific, pure boondocking location back the Gros Ventre Road just east of Grand Teton Natl. Park. (Locally pronounced: “Grow Vaunt”) One of the most beautiful roads in all of Wyoming, which penetrates some 30 miles into the wilds! It is a destination unto itself! It is not a place to stay for day trips back to Grand Teton/Yellowstone Nat’l Parks.

The road is well-maintained gravel, with some wash boarding, and a bit of a drive to get back to the National Park or the town of Jackson. Although the road is well traveled there are NO SERVICES! You are in wild Wyoming! A favorite boondocking area by Jackson Hole residents and ranchers! Slide Lake, the Gros Ventre River and Crystal Creek have good trout fishing. There are lots of OHV trails and pure wilderness access! Hiking is just plain terrific! This is all US Forest Svc public land with the exception of some well marked private ranches.

11. Grand Teton National Park Free Campsites – Darby Canyon

Address
Alta, Wyoming
GPS: 43.67912, -110.987642
Elevation: 6883′

Management: Forest Service

Best Review:

Darby canyon has free camping. About 15-20 minutes from Driggs. No amenities. Some cowpies, which is a downer depending on the site. Totally legit though as long as you have less than twenty people and some other restrictions. Stream nearby. The wind cave and some awesome views are a bit further up the Darby Canyon Trail. Flat ground. Pretty good time. Dispersed camping is allowed through most of the Jedidiah Smith Wilderness with some exceptions as posted, just so you know.

12. Grand Teton National Park Free Campsites – Curtis Canyon (dispersed camping)

Address
Curtis Canyon Road
Jackson, Wyoming
GPS: 43.514127, -110.660247
Elevation: 6991′

Management: Forest Service

The road in is Gravel. There are 1-5 campsites at this location and the maximum RV length is 35 feet. You may stay 5 nights at Curtis Canyon (dispersed camping).

Best Review:

This campsite is basically a moderately-sized flat open area with firepits that is sandwiched in between two officially marked (and paid) campsites in the area. There were about 3 other cars and an RV camped out there when we stayed. Beautiful views of the Tetons. About 30 minutes from Jackson Hole. You drive through the Elk Refuge and up a dirt road to get to the site. If all the sites are taken, the official Curtis Canyon campground and one other camping area are right next to it. You can also continue up Sheep Creek Road and find a ton of other free campsites.

6 Alternative Paid Campsites $5 to $10 Per Night

These campsites do  charge a small fee but do offer more services than the boondocking sites above.  For many they may want to exchange the comforts of a paid site over the scenery and solitude of a boondocking site.

1. Grand Teton National Park Free Campsites – Pacific Creek near Grand Teton NP

Address
Pacific Creek Rd trail head
Moran, Wyoming
GPS: 43.940651, -110.44162
Elevation: 7022′

Management: Forest Service (USDA)

The road in is Gravel. Pacific Creek near Grand Teton NP is open Early June – Late Sept weather permitting. There are 6-15 campsites at this location. You may stay 14 days at Pacific Creek near Grand Teton NP. Located 11½ miles east of Highway 89/287 on Pacific Creek Road. No services. A hosted Forest Svc campground @ $5/night.

Amenities

Fire Ring
Horse Corral
Picnic Tables
Restrooms

Best Review:

Have stayed here a few times, most recently the week before the 4th of July. The campsites are very large and decently easy to access, the road is unpaved/dirt most of the way but not rough at all- I was able to drive it in a Honda Fit without concern. There’s no service at any of the sites, but there is a few miles up the road. There are bear boxes at every site and no fire rings but it was easy to gather rocks and make my own ring. The creek was gorgeous, and the site is located right within the park so very convenient- probably 20-30 minutes from Jackson Lake Lodge. I went at 9am and had my choice of almost any site.

2. Grand Teton National Park Free Campsites – Teton Canyon Campground

Address
Alta, Wyoming
GPS: 43.756678, -110.918455

Management: Forest Service

The price is $12/night

Best Review:

The pay campground was very nice and each site had a table, fire ring and (my personal favorite) bear box. Plenty of flat space to put a tent. The only con of the paid site was that there were tons of trailers around and one of them decided to run a generator all the time which doesn’t really seem like camping to me.

We strolled in without a reservation on a Thursday evening and got lucky enough to get the very last spot. We wanted to stay in the pay site so we could get up early to do the Alaska Basin hike as an out-and-back. If I were to do this again, I’d plan a bit further in advance so I could have the campsite reserved since it does seem pretty popular.

3. Grand Teton National Park Free Campsites – Hatchet Campground Bridger-Teton National Forest

Address
Moran, Wyoming
GPS: 43.824106, -110.356137
Elevation: 6880′

Management: Forest Service

The price is $10/night. Clean bathroom, nice campground.

Best Review:

We got the last spot that would handle our 19′ Jayco. Wouldn’t suggest this place if you are any bigger as sites are on the small side. Stayed one night

4. Grand Teton National Park Free Campsites – Box Creek

Address
Forest Road 30070
Moran, Wyoming
GPS: 43.860728, -110.294461
Elevation: 7093′

Management: Forest Service

The price is $10/night. Box Creek is open Jun-Sep. The maximum RV length at Box Creek is 30 feet. This campsite is located within the Bridger-Teton National Forest’s Blackrock Ranger District. This is a high elevation location.

Best Review:

None

5. Grand Teton National Park Free Campsites – Sheffield Creek, Yellowstone South Entrance

Address
J D Rockefeller Pkway
Flag Ranch, Wyoming
GPS: 44.092087, -110.663567
Elevation: 6900′

Management: Forest Service (USDA)

This is a PAY campground. ($12 or less). The road in is Gravel and 1 miles from a paved road. Sheffield Creek, Yellowstone South Entrance is open Late May to Late Sept Weather Permitting. There are 1-5 campsites at this location.

Best Review:

I loved this place! Stayed there summer of 2022. There is a stream to drive across and I was concerned about whether I should try it and ultimately did. Turned out to be easy but your mileage may vary depending on how fast the stream is running. Great hiking trail. Campsites spaced far apart. Mosquitoes sometimes a problem, sometimes not. Close to south entrance of Yellowstone. Campfire ok when I was there.

6. Grand Teton National Park Free Campsites – Turpin Meadow

Address
Forest Road 30066A
Moran, Wyoming
GPS: 43.854984, -110.262928
Elevation: 6946′

Management: Forest Service

The price is $10/night. Turpin Meadow is open May-Sep. This free campsite is part of the Blackrock Ranger District of the Bridger-Teton National Forest and about 10 minute drive from U.S Hwy 26 on Buffalo Valley Road (then about 100 yards on a dirt road). You can stay at this site location for up to 16 days.

Amenities

Drinking Water
Restrooms

Best Review:

This an awesome secluded spot right off the road in route to Turpin Meadows campground (which is paid camping). There are other campsites along the road but you will more than likely have neighbors parked right next to you. This location will give you privacy without the road traffic or neighbors parked near you. You can stay at this site location for up to 16 days. There is a designated fire pit and the site overlooks the Buffalo Fork River. With a short walk you are able to see the Grand Tetons from the site. We were woke up by bugling Elk one of the mornings we stayed and saw a about 30 head coming into camp another night across the river. You will pass by many a handful of ranches in route to this location. We would have stayed longer as the site is absolutely beautiful overloading the valley There is no Verizon cell phone service at this location or other amenities.

Top Trails to Hike at the Grand Teton National Park National Park



The Grand Teton National Park features numerous hiking trails with some taking a few minutes while others can take the whole day and night to cover.

1. Phelps Lake Trail

1. Phelps Lake Trail - Grand Teton National Park Free Campsites

This trail is located southwest of Moose Entrance. Phelps Lake is a popular feature of the Death Canyon Trail. It will take about 4 miles of trail to circle Phelps Lake completely. There are alternative routes such as a trail system that leads you to the Laurance S. Rockefeller Preserve. Phelps Lake trail can extend into an entire day’s adventure.

Length: 7.0 mi
Elevation gain: 725 ft
Route type: Loop

Backpacking, Camping, Hiking, Bird watching, Running, Forest, Lake, River, Views, Wildflowers, Wildlife, Fee, No dogs

2. Paintbrush Canyon Trail and Paintbrush Divide

2. Paintbrush Canyon Trail and Paintbrush Divide Grand Teton National Park Free Campsites

Starting with the String Lake Trailhead, this trail gives an entire palette of color and amazing mountain surroundings. This trail is about seven miles with much to view. This trail is tough, a steep hike to test your legs since by every step you make, you gain elevation.

Length: 20.6 mi
Elevation gain: 5,643 ft
Route type: Loop

Backpacking, Camping, Hiking, Walking, Bird watching, Running, Beach, Forest, Lake, River, Views, Wildflowers, Wildlife, Fee, No dogs

3. Cascade Canyon Trail and Lake Solitude

3. Cascade Canyon Trail and Lake Solitude - grand teton national park

The Cascade Canyon is accessible either by hiking around Jenny Lake or via the Jenny Lake ferry that takes you across every fifteen minutes. A journey through this trail is rewarded with the beautiful shores of Lake Solitude. This trail climbs up to 2300 feet. It is about nine miles.

Length: 9.1 mi
Elevation gain: 1,102 ft
Route type: Out & back

Backpacking, Camping, Hiking, Forest, Lake, River, Views, Waterfall, Wildflowers, Wildlife, Rocky, Fee, No dogs

4. Death Canyon Trail

4. Death Canyon Trail - grand teton national park

This trail features abundant wildlife sightings, craggy surroundings, and wildflowers. This trail is very steep climbing up to 2000 feet in just 4 miles. In the end, you reach the Static Peak Divide junction.

Length: 18.7 mi
Elevation gain: 3,792 ft
Route type: Out & back

Hiking, Bird watching, Forest, Views, Wildflowers, Wildlife, Fee, No dogs

Costs and Camping For the Grand Teton National Park

The Grand Teton National park charges a 7-day entrance permit. For a private vehicle, you pay $35 for 7days, private non-commercial vehicle. If you visit with your motorcycle, you pay $30 for 7 days per motorcycle. A hiker/biker pays $20 for 7 days per hiker/biker. Children below 16 years enter for free.

If you visit the park with a commercial vehicle, the charges are based on the seating capacity of your vehicle. For a seating capacity of 1-6, the charges are an extra $15 per person, 7-15 is $125 and 16-25 is$200 while for 26+ the charges are $300.

How to Get To the Grand Teton National Park National Park

If you are coming from far, fly to the Jackson Hole Airport which is the closest airport followed by the Idaho Falls Regional Airport. From the airport, there is a scheduled private shuttle or you can hire a car, taxi, or Uber. The park has three official entrances: the Moose entrance if you are coming from Jackson and the Moran entrance for tourists coming from Denver. If you are coming from Yellowstone, there is no official entrance so you can just drive straight into the park.

Why Visit the Grand Teton National Park National Park?

You will find few landscapes in the world that are interesting, striking, and memorable as the Grand Teton National Park. This national park has so much to offer including valleys, rivers, mountains, wildlife, wildflowers, skies, abundant flowers, and anything else that interests you. On top of that, the Grand Teton National Park boasts a rich cultural history including old homesteads and cattle ranches. Walk on the trails that were built by the Civilians Conservations Corps. These are just a few things you will enjoy in this park thus an incredible way to spend your holiday.

Things to Do at the Big Grand Teton National Park

For lasting memories at the Grand Teton National Park, ensure you visit the following areas and enjoy the different beauty scenery each one hast to offer:

1. Wildlife viewing

Wildlife viewing at the Grand Teton National Park is at times considered the best. The wildlife is diverse including creatures and animals such as Moose, Bears, Eagles, Bison, and Pronghorn. The best place to see bears changes with time and the best option is to enquire about it at the visitors center once you are in the park. However, some of the best spots to view wildlife include Elk Ranch, Oxbow Bend Moose, and Lake Lodge.

2. Horseback rides

Spend some time in the morning and the afternoon in the Grand Teton National Park horse riding and enjoy the views just like the early explorers. Horse riding offers you two hours of scenic rides where you enjoy the views of the Oxbow Bend, Tetons, and the Snake River.

3. Sailing On the Snake River

Enjoy these scenes with a knowledgeable guide who will share knowledge of history, geology, and wildlife. They will answer any questions you have regarding the Grand Teton National Park.

4. Hiking

The famous short hikes are Leigh Lake, Hidden Falls and Inspiration Point, Swan and Heron Pond, and String lake. If you are looking for a more challenging full-day hike, choose the Death Canyon, Cascade Canyon, or Paintbrush Canyon and enjoy the towering granite peaks as also, the beautiful remote lakes.

5. Fishing

Whether you are looking for lake fishing or fly fishing, you will find them In the Grand Teton National Park. Fishing in the Snake River or the Jenny Lake Jackson is amazing and you will not forget about it.

How Much Time Do You Need For Your Visit

If you just want to discover the Teton chain and see the different viewpoints on the lake including a short walk, a whole day will be enough. If you enjoy nature and wish to hike, at least two days to enjoy everything. However, keep in mind that the hikes are many with varying durations. Therefore, consider your program. If you want to see the wildlife, be present at dawn and at dusk to maximize your chances. Therefore, the least you can do at the Grand Teton National Park is spending a night.

Accommodations and Dining Near the Grand Teton National Park National Park

Grand Teton National Park and the Jackson town provide numerous places for accommodation, The accommodation here ranges from first-class lodging to budget-friendly accommodations. There are luxury hotels such as Four Seasons Resort located in Teton near Jackson Hole Mountain Resort, mid-range hotels including Cowboy Village Resort, and budget hotels such as the Super 8 Driggs.

Best Time to Visit the Grand Teton National Park National Park

The best time to visit the Grand Teton National Park is between mid-May and late September. During this time, all the hiking trails, visitor centers, and other park activities such as fishing and kayaking are open and easy to access. By the start of October, winter blows, shutting most of the facilities and roads.

What to Pack For Your Visit To the Grand Teton National Park National Park

If you wish to have a memorable experience at the Grand Teton National Park, the following items are essential for your trip:
– Camera
– Food and snacks
– Sunglasses, a hat to protect you from sunburn and sun cream
– Clothing and footwear: Carry light clothes for hiking and enough layers in case the temperatures get too cold at night.
– Water bottles for hydration whether experiencing the tough trails.
– Hiking shoes and a first aid kid due to possible injuries.


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