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16 Fantastic Kenai Fjords National Park Boondocking Spots

Last updated on May 7th, 2022 at 11:18 pm

Kenai Fjords National Park

If you’re planning a trip to Alaska, don’t miss the Kenai Fjords National Park. In addition to its glaciers and abundance of wildlife, the Kenai Fjords National Park Free Campsites are known for accessibility. It is located approximately 2.5 hours south of Anchorage, which serves as a good starting point for exploring the surrounding area and visiting its various attractions.

Of course, visitors to Kenai Fjords National Park come for the Harding Icefield, but there is so much more to see and do in the park that you’ll want to keep reading to find out what else there is to do. A trip to Alaska would not be complete without visiting Kenai Fjords National Park Free Campsites, towering tidewater glaciers, orcas, and humpback whales. In addition, Kenai is one of the most diverse ecosystems in any national park in the United States, including Yellowstone found in this breathtaking landscape of mountains and sea.

Kenai Fjords National Park Free Campsites is located in southern Alaska and covers nearly 1,000 square miles of land and sea. But unlike most national parks, you will not be able to drive to the main attractions in your car. Instead, from a boat, you’ll get the best view of the park’s wildlife and landscape.

Because of the abundance of nutrients found in glacially-fed waters, fjords can be accessed by boat with Major Marine Tours. It is also an ideal habitat for various animals in the area. For example, a cruise through the Kenai Fjords National Park Free Campsites is an incredible way to see whales, puffins, and calving glaciers up close. Cruises are offered daily from March through October, with various half-and full-day boat options.

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The Kenai Fjords National Park’s History

Kenai Fjords National Monument was initially designated by President Jimmy Carter on December 1, 1978, using the Antiquities Act, pending final legislation to resolve the allotment of public lands in Alaska. Establishment as a national park followed the passage of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act in 1980.

Kenai Fjords is a geological landform story and a story about people’s lives. According to the evidence from archaeological excavations, Alaska Natives have been living in the area for thousands of years. Hunters, fox farms, gold miners, and others have recently exploited the fjords’ natural resources. It was designated a national monument in 1978.

An Alaskan national park, Kenai Fjords National Park, contains numerous stories about people and places from the northern Gulf Coast. From the Sugpiaq encampment littering the beach to the mining camps in Nuka Bay, these stories cover a wide range of topics. Various artifacts from bygone eras can be found here. Conservation of these time capsules is just as important as any other natural feature because they are irreplaceable.

16 Fantastic Kenai Fjords National Park Boondocking Spots

1. Kenai Fjords National Park Boondocking Locations – Exit Glacier Road

Address
Seward, Alaska
GPS: 60.1539, -149.431366
Elevation: 105′

Management – Public – Forest Service (USDA) (Official)

The road in is Paved. There are 6-15 campsites at this location. You may stay 6 days at Exit Glacier Road. Near Seward, Ak, Exit Glacier is the most accessible glacier in the state. From the park entrance, it is a short hike to the actual glacier. Camping area is actually in the Chugach national forest.

2. Kenai Fjords National Park Boondocking Free Campsites – Exit Glacier Road

Address
Seward, Alaska
GPS: 60.1539, -149.431366
Elevation: 105′

Management – Public – Forest Service (USDA) (Official)

The road in is Paved. There are 6-15 campsites at this location. Along the road going into the park, there are several large asphalt pullouts suitable for overnighting. Additionally, there are 6-10 small wooded campsites right off the road suitable for a small rig. Much over 30′ would not be recommended. You may stay 6 days at Exit Glacier Road.

3. Kenai Fjords National Park Boondocking Spots – Engineer lake

Address
Alaska
GPS: 60.473583, -150.327231
Elevation: 295′

Management – Public – State Forest (Unofficial)

Smaller site suit no more than 30′ RVs. Narrow rd in so use caution on road. Overlooking lake with picnic tables.

4. Kenai Fjords National Park Boondocking Locations – Moose Pass

Address
Hwy 1 north of Moose Pass
Moose Pass, Alaska
GPS: 60.501698, -149.371721
Elevation: 494′

Management – Public – Rest Area (Unofficial)

The road in is Gravel. There are 6-15 campsites at this location and the maximum RV length is unlimited. Large gravel area next to lake off the road to the east. Around 7-8 self made areas but room for plenty more. Boat ramp and lake access.

5. Kenai Fjords National Park Boondocking Sites – Lower Skilak Lake Campground

Address
Cooper Landing, Alaska
GPS: 60.471663, -150.468114
Elevation: 213′

Management – Public – State Park (Official)

The farthest campground on Skilak Lake Road. this is the only free campground of the three campsites on Lake Skilak. Can be approached from either end of Skilak Lake Road it’s on a gravel road suitable for small to medium RVs. Probably would not take a class A or a fifth wheel down to this campsite.

6. Kenai Fjords National Park Boondocking Spots – Kelly/Peterson lakes

Address
mile post 68 Sterling Hwy Alaska
Sterling, Alaska
GPS: 60.525374, -150.396824
Elevation: 287′

Management – Public – State Park (Official)

The road in is Dirt and 1 miles from a paved road. Kelly/Peterson lakes is open May until snow. There are 6-15 campsites at this location and the maximum RV length is unlimited. You may stay 14 at Kelly/Peterson lakes.

7. Kenai Fjords National Park Boondocking Locations – Kasilof River/ Tustumina

Address
Kasilof, Alaska
GPS: 60.253939, -151.173234
Elevation: 112′

Management – Public – Forest Service (Official)

The road in is Gravel and 5 miles from a paved road. There are 1-5 campsites at this location and the maximum RV length is 35 feet. Boat Ramp with a handful of secluded spots. Big enough for larger rigs.

8. Kenai Fjords National Park Boondocking Sites – Behind boulder off highway AK1S

Address
Hope, Alaska
GPS: 60.7625, -149.39694
Elevation: 541′

Management – Public (Unofficial)

Heading south from anchorage to steward on highway AK1-S, in between mile signs 57 and 58 (which will be on the left side of the road) but closer to mile sign 58, you’ll see a large boulder or raised up rock formation on the right side of the road. There are pull ins before and after the rock.

9. Kenai Fjords National Park Boondocking Spots – Fred Meyer’s #70100017

Address
43843 Sterling Hwy.
Soldotna, Alaska
GPS: 60.489015, -151.049291
Elevation: 121′

Management – Private – Retail Store (Official)

The road in is Paved. There are 30 or more campsites at this location and the maximum RV length is unlimited. You may stay 7 days at Fred Meyer’s #70100017.

10. Kenai Fjords National Park Boondocking Locations – Resurrection Creek

Address
Hope, Alaska
GPS: 60.876251, -149.630966
Elevation: 331′

Management – Public – Forest Service (USDA) (Unofficial)

Camped here in July 2009. Biting black flies and “gold bugs” throughout the area. Will include pics shortly.

11. Kenai Fjords National Park Boondocking Sites – Portage Lake Road

Address
Whittier, Alaska
GPS: 60.797165, -148.912216
Elevation: 37′

Management – Public – Forest Service (USDA) (Unofficial)

The road in is Gravel and 1/8 miles from a paved road. There are several gravel pull outs in the Chugash National Forest along this road headed for Portage Lake and Glacier. A few are suitable for big rigs. Trees, river, mountains and glacier and free camping. May, 2013 we stayed overnight in a 27′ motorhome.

12. Kenai Fjords National Park Boondocking Spots – Mile Post 13 Hope Rd

Address
Hope, Alaska
GPS: 60.92955, -149.54168
Elevation: 7′

Management – Public (Official)

The road in is Gravel and .1 miles from a paved road. There are 1-5 campsites at this location. Several pullouts along a gravel road. Ii is in Chugach State Park land.

13. Kenai Fjords National Park Boondocking Locations – Crow Creek Road

Address
Anchorage, Alaska
GPS: 60.995914, -149.091706
Elevation: 709′

Management – Public – State Park (Unofficial)

Several pullouts along a gravel road. I think it is in Chugach State Park land.

14. Kenai Fjords National Park Boondocking Sites – South Fork Eagle River

Address
Anchorage, Alaska
GPS: 61.222001, -149.439708
Elevation: 2110′

Management – Public – State Park (Unofficial)

At the trail head for several awesome hikes in the Chugach Stat. Parking is near homes, no fires allowed and multiple nights be frowned upon. Room for a truck camper or car camping. Not really room for an RV.

15. Kenai Fjords National Park Boondocking Spots – Lake Lorraine Campground

Address
Wasilla, Alaska
GPS: 61.2889, -149.94513
Elevation: 184′

Management – Public (Official)

The road in is Gravel and at eight miles from a paved road. Lake Lorraine Campground is open summer. There are 6-15 campsites at this location. You may stay 14 days at Lake Lorraine Campground.

16. Kenai Fjords National Park Boondocking Locations – Mt. Baldy Trailhead

 

Address
Anchorage, Alaska
GPS: 61.338, -149.512
Elevation: 1834′

Management – Public – Rest Area (Unofficial)

The road in is Paved. Small parking before the trail. On a unit flat and You Will probably not be able for an RV but it was ok for a camper van. Let’s be honest there is not much choice near Anchorage.

8 Great Trails Near the Kenai Fjords National Park

Do you love hiking trails . If you do, here are some of the best trails in Kenai Fjords National Park Free Campsites.

Kenai Fjords National Park Hiking Trail #1. Harding Icefield Trail

1 Harding Icefield Trail Kenai Fjords National Park

I highly recommend the Harding Icefield hike in Alaska if you’re a hiker with some spare time here in Kenai Fjords National Park Free Campsites. These views are breathtaking and one of the most memorable experiences I’ve had in Alaska. However, I’m afraid this will be a DIFFICULT and LONG trek. I trust you get what I mean.

Due to the difficulty of the terrain, this hike is not recommended for first-time hikers. However, hikers of all skill levels will enjoy this route. If you can’t appreciate the view, I don’t think it’s worth the effort. Choose a day with good visibility, such as a sunny or foggy one.

Plan to bring plenty of food and water with you if you decide to go on this trek. If the weather suddenly changes, you’ll want to have plenty of extra clothing on hand.

Length: 9.2 mi
Elevation gain: 3,641 ft
Route type: Out & back

Camping, Hiking, Bird watching, Running, Forest, River, Views, Waterfall, Wildflowers, Wildlife, Rocky, Snow, No shade, No dogs

Kenai Fjords National Park Hiking Trail #2. Calvin and Coyle Trail

2 Calvin and Coyle Trail Kenai Fjords National Park

This delightful little nature walk winds through dense spruce woods and magnificent open meadows near Homer off East End Road. The Beluga Wetlands observation deck provides spectacular birding and wildlife viewing opportunities. In January, the trail can be pretty icy, so be sure to bring spikes. An unmarked path that has not seen much use. Countless thrushes flew by and sent us tweets.

Spread out educational signage provide a wealth of information about animals and ecosystems. A nice place to walk your dog. An excellent little nature walk. Afterward, we walked in the woods near the Bear Creek Winery. However, even though it had rained, the route wasn’t too slick; we were able to navigate it with ease, thanks in part to the boardwalk planks that were neither slippery nor spongy.

Length: 1.3 mi
Elevation gain: 104 ft
Route type: Loop

Hiking, Walking, Running, Dog friendly, Forest, Views, Wildflowers, Wildlife, Muddy

Kenai Fjords National Park Hiking Trail #3. Alaska’s Captain Cook Bishop Trail

3 Captain Cook Kenai Fjords National Park Boondocking Locations

There’s nothing better than a stroll down the beach, mainly if the area is completely deserted. Out here, you get that vibe. Afterward, take a walk on the beach with the entire family and enjoy the picnic spot (with its million-dollar vista). If you’re in the neighborhood, it’s well worth a stop for a look around. You may get a great view of the Cook Inlet from a short walk down the beach. At low tide, the atmosphere is eerily desolate and unwelcoming.

The Alaska Range may be seen from the summit. It’s a terrific place to relax and enjoy the view of Mount Iliamna at the end of the park. Keep to the sand and water! At low tide, the boulders seem tempting, but the mud is fine silt that may suffocate your feet and make it difficult to extricate them. Many individuals have drowned as a result of this error.

Length: 1.3 mi
Elevation gain: 160 ft
Route type: Out & back

Kid friendly, Hiking, Nature trips, Forest, River, Views, Wildflowers, Wildlife

Kenai Fjords National Park Hiking Trail #4. Hiking the Tonsina Creek Trail in Seward, Alaska

4 Tonsina Creek Trail Kenai Fjords National Park Boondocking Free Campsites

Tonsina Creek is reached after a three-mile hike that takes you from Lowell Point’s stunning beach area through beautiful hemlock and spruce trees. Take a moment to appreciate the views of Resurrection Bay as you ascend a little distance. The Tonsina Creek Path in Seward, Alaska, is a 5.5-mile out-and-back route that is heavily traveled and rated intermediate for its abundance of wildflowers. Open year-round, the trail is popular for hiking, walking, and snowshoeing. A leash is required for dogs to utilize this path.

When the weather is beautiful, many people will be out on this year-round trail. In addition, it’s a straightforward course, making it a popular choice for visitors from out of town. In the winter, spikes may be necessary. Low tide isn’t essential for a trip just to Tonsina Beach, but it is for Caines Head. On the way to the beach, we stopped to admire the most amazing skipping stones we’ve ever seen. These are the big ones that skip a lot and then break into multiple pieces. The excursion ended at the beach since we went at high tide. Beautiful landscapes.

Length: 3.4 mi
Elevation gain: 734 ft
Route type: Out & back

Dogs on leash, Kid friendly, Hiking, Snowshoeing, Walking, Beach, Forest, Views, Wildflowers, Wildlife

Kenai Fjords National Park Hiking Trail #5. Alaska’s Bear Mountain Trail – Sterling

5 Bear Mountain Trail Kenai Fjords National Park Boondocking Free Campsites

Take the Skilak Lake Loop in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge to mile marker 6.9 (available from Sterling or Cooper Landing). There is a somewhat steep. 8-kilometer ascent, but the view you’ll be greeted with at the top is more than worth the effort. Skilak Lake and the Kenai Mountains may be seen in the distance. The arduous journey to the mountain’s summit is frequently unprotected, steep, and rugged. The 2.3-mile hike to the summit of Bear Mountain ascends more than 1,800 feet in elevation. However, the path offers stunning views along the way, as well as several turn-around locations for those who don’t want to trek the entire distance. “It’s about the journey, not the goal.” That’s what Bear Canyon Trail is all about.

Getting to the wilderness limit at the foot of the mountain requires a short quarter-mile climb from the trailhead, located on a major highway and next to a parking lot. At this point, the terrain is narrow and steep, ascending about 450 feet in switchbacks. Five hundred feet of rocky elevation in a tiny side canyon lead to a massive plateau after it levels off for a short time. There is a 400-foot artificial crest at the top of the plateau, which it traverses slowly. To the right (northeast) (northeast) are Fay Canyon vistas (northeast).

To reach the summit, the route ascends a few hundred feet. Awe-inspiring panoramas may be seen in this area. A glimpse of the San Francisco Peaks can be seen in the north after a further 200 yards of flat land via Red Canyon. Then, return the same way you came. If there is a lot of snow on the mountain, avoid this hike.

Length: 3.5 mi
Elevation gain: 2,631 ft
Route type: Out & back

Hiking, Nature trips, Walking, Bird watching, Forest, Views, Wildflowers

Kenai Fjords National Park Hiking Trail #6. Kenai National Wildlife Refuge

6 Hidden Creek Kenai Fjords National Park Boondocking Spots

 

A well-maintained trail, the Kenai Nature Trail, is an excellent place to start. Visitors to the Kenai Fjords National Park Free Campsites may detach Headquarters Lake, which is a short distance from the refuge. Continue to the Centennial Trail Loop, a two-mile nature trail that provides excellent animal watching possibilities.

Length: 2.6 mi
Elevation gain: 269 ft
Route type: Loop

Kid friendly, Cross-country skiing, Hiking, Nature trips, Snowshoeing, Walking, Forest, Lake, Views, Wildflowers, Wildlife, No dogs

Kenai Fjords National Park Hiking Trail #7. Cooper Landing, Alaska’s Hidden Creek Trail is a three-mile-long route

6 Kenai National Wildlife Refuge Kenai Fjords National Park Boondocking Spots

Flat and meandering, this three-mile out-and-back track is situated off the Skilak Lake Loop. Between July and August, you’ll pass through a range of landscapes and have plenty of opportunities to collect berries. In addition, you’ll drive through an old burn area from the 1996 wildfire, which offers spectacular views of the nearby Kenai Mountains in the distance.

Length: 2.9 mi
Elevation gain: 396 ft
Route type: Loop

Hiking, Nature trips, Walking, Bird watching, Forest, Lake, Views, Wildflowers

Kenai Fjords National Park Hiking Trail #8. Russian River Falls is located near Cooper Landing, Alaska

8 Russian River Falls Kenai Fjords National Park Hiking Trail

The Russian River Campground is the starting point for this fantastic hike. The whole family will love the broad gravel route with minimal elevation rise. Salmon may be seen swimming in the streams below the falls in the summer. However, bears are known to frequent this region, so use caution.

Length: 5.2 mi
Elevation gain: 610 ft
Route type: Out & back

Wheelchair friendly, Kid friendly, Stroller friendly, Fishing, Hiking, Nature trips, Walking, Bird watching, Running, Forest, River, Views, Waterfall, Wildflowers, Fee

Places and Activities in Kenai Fjords National Park

Enjoy Whale-watching at Kenai Fjords National Park.

The Kenai Fjords whale-watching cruise is an excellent option for anyone who wants to see animals in their natural habitat. While visiting Kenai Fjords National Park Free Campsites, it is common to see humpback whales and orcas. Humpback whales and orcas (killer whales) are more common sightings than Minke whales and fin whales, but they are still possible killer whales. The best time to go whale watching in Alaska is during daylight hours from June through August. You can also go for whale watching in the Kenai Fjords.

Visiting Exit Glacier Is a Must-do.

There is only one Glacier in the Kenai Fjords National Park Free Campsites that can be accessed by vehicle, and it is Exit Glacier. This Glacier can be seen in all its glory from various hiking trails in Alaska. The Exit Glacier Nature Center is a must-see before you leave. Ranger staff is on hand to answer any questions you may have about the area.

Kayaking in Kenai Fjords National Park.

It’s a great way to see the park if you’ve got some experience in kayaking. Compared to using a boat, which makes more noise and makes it more difficult to sneak into nature, paddling allows you to get closer to it without being noticed. So if you’ve always wanted to try kayaking, this is the place for you. You will have an incredible experience surrounded by a plethora of wildlife and protected coves as well as wild and rocky beaches.

Kayaking into the Kenai Fjords National Park Free Campsites on your own is a problematic endeavor. For your safety and the safety of other visitors, the National Park Service recommends that you travel with a guide. Other options include having your kayak delivered nearby and paddling around protected areas once you’ve arrived at your campsite. A kayak can also be dropped off at the public use cabins.

Go Boat Sightseeing In the Fjords

This is the park’s most famous attraction and for a good reason. A trip on a boat to see the massive glaciers merge with the ocean is an experience you won’t forget. If you’re on a ship, there’s a good chance you’ll see wildlife like whales, harbor seals, bald eagles, sea lions, and sea otters.


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