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8 Free Caprock Canyons State Park Boondocking Locations

Caprock Canyons State Park Boondocking Locations

While Caprock Canyons State Park boondocking locations consist mainly of City and County Parks around Caprock Canyons State Park Boondocking we have discovered a few gems nearby. The campgrounds are beautiful with lots of space and vegetation between most sites. The wildlife during our stay was abundant and we woke up to bison on or near our site every day. Trails in the canyon are well maintained and provide tons of beautiful views of the Permian red rocks. The vistas are plentiful. The nearby town of Quitaque is quaint but small; however, there are a few nice places to eat.

8 Free Caprock Canyons State Park Boondocking Locations

1. Free Caprock Canyons State Park Boondocking – Silverton Municipal City Park

Silverton, Texas
GPS: 34.473827, -101.307309
Elevation: 3281′

City Park (Official)

3 Free 50 Amp and water hookups at small City Park and a good stop to start a Caprock Canyons State Park Boondocking trip. Sites are level gravel and grass. Can accommodate large rig. Nice playground area. Restaurant within walking distance.

Amenities:

Drinking Water
Electricity
Playground
Trash Cans

2. Free Caprock Canyons State Park Boondocking Locations – Wayne Russell Municipal RV Park

Address
US 70
Floydada, Texas
GPS: 33.993321, -101.341774
Elevation: 3190′

City Park (Official)

Super nice little park there was one RV when I arrived level ground made setting up my tent easy. The road noise settled down shortly after dark and I got a good night sleep. I would certainly stay here again, My compliments to the city of Floydada TX. for their fine work in providing a nice place for travelers to stop and rest. Clean pleasant and biker friendly. The road in is Paved. There are 6-15 campsites at this location Caprock Canyons State Park Boondocking site The maximum RV length is 40+. You may stay 5 days at Wayne Russell Municipal RV Park.

Amenities:

Drinking Water
Dump Station
Electricity
Picnic Tables
Sewer

3. Free Caprock Canyons State Park Boondocking Locations – Lions Park

24 Texas 207
Ralls, Texas
GPS: 33.669966, -101.387241
Elevation: 3107′

City Park (Official)

4 back in campsites with 30 amp electrical and water. Located on the South side of the pool building. Dump station on North side of pool building by the road. City worker says the place is free for 3 nights. Not recommended for RVs over 24 foot long. The road in to this Caprock Canyons State Park Boondocking Locations is gravel and .25 miles from a paved road. There are 1-5 campsites at this location and the maximum RV length is 25 feet. You may stay 3 nights at Lions Park.

Amenities:

Drinking Water
Dump Station
Electricity
Trash Cans

4. Free Caprock Canyons State Park Boondocking – Crosbyton City Park

US 82 and Aspen Street intersection
Crosbyton, Texas
GPS: 33.658775, -101.232216
Elevation: 3011′
Get Directions
City Park (Official)

Another great small town run RV park and place to start your Caprock Canyons State Park Boondocking trip. Word of caution: each pull through spot has a sewer drain hook-up. That’s nice. But I just watched a jackass pull in, dump his tanks at one of the spots and then rinse out his poop tube with the fresh water faucet at that spot! Think about it the next time you want to fill your fresh water tank at such an arrangement. Super cell service because the tower is right next to the park. Love these little parks. The road in is Paved. There are 1-5 campsites at this location and the maximum RV length is 40+.

Amenities:

Drinking Water
Electricity
Picnic Tables
Restrooms
Playground
Sewer

5. Free Caprock Canyons State Park Boondocking Locations – Silver Falls Rest Area

Crosbyton, Texas
GPS: 33.665995, -101.158621
Elevation: 2671′

Rest Area (Official)

Texas does not have many rest areas, but this one is spectacular and good for a Caprock Canyons State Park Boondocking Locations stop for a night or two. It is located about 45 miles east of Lubbock eastbound on Highway 82. It is nestled and a small Valley very well maintained and very nice restrooms.

6. Caprock Canyons State Park Camping Spots – Raspberry Park, West of Crowell Tx

Truscott, Texas
GPS: 34.013225, -99.897041
Elevation: 1677′

Rest Area (Official)

Picnic area. Large parking area with 2 picnic shelters with tables. 24 hour stay allowed in TX REST AREAS You may stay overnight at Raspberry park, west of Crowell Tx.

Amenities:

Pets Welcome
Trash Cans

7. Free Caprock Canyons State Park Boondocking – SH 207 Palo Duro Canyon Overlook

Claude, Texas
GPS: 34.797817, -101.43932
Elevation: 3127′

Rest Area (Official)

Rest area with good parking and a beautiful overlook showcasing the lower reaches of Palo Duro Canyon. A perfect free Caprock Canyons State Park Camping Spots for a stop, Large, flat grassy area where we pitched a tent with no trouble a few years back (2010-ish). No facilities except picnic tables, but it’s well above the road so it’s quiet and dark. The road in is Paved.

Amenities:

Picnic Tables
Trash Cans

8. Free Caprock Canyons State Park Boondocking Locations – Memphis City

Broome Road
Memphis, Texas
GPS: 34.711578, -100.535564
Elevation: 1995′

City Park

We were able to call ahead and setup the free permit to be here as we were not coming in until after the city hall closed. Make sure you call if you will arrive after 5 PM weekdays. You must have the free permit on file at city hall to stay here. There are 8 spots with water, 20, 30, and 50 amp. I do not see a dump station anywhere in the park. We extended our stay for three over nights, they did not say anything about paying, but we donated a little to the city for upkeep of the park and the use of water and electric. The town of Memphis maintains this free camping area. Conventient to the park, a great Caprock Canyons State Park Boondocking location.

Amenities:

Dump Station

Paid Caprock Canyons State Park Boondocking Locations

1. Paid Caprock Canyons State Park Camping Spots – Buffalo Lake NWR

Farm to Market Road 168
Canyon, Texas
GPS: 34.892586, -102.115316
Elevation: 3645′

Fish and Wildlife

Cost is $2 Day

THIS CAMPGROUND IS CLOSED FROM 6PM TO 8AM. There is an automatically locking gate that locks at 6pm every night. I don’t know if that’s just seasonal or not. This is a dispersed campsite. First come -> first served. No reservations accepted.

2. Paid Caprock Canyons State Park Camping Spots – Lake McClellan Campground

Address
Pampa, Texas
GPS: 35.21172, -100.874619
Elevation: 2943′

McClellan Creek National Grasslands

Cost $10 Day

We stayed 1 night and found it to be perfect. We had electric and water hookups and a dump station. We didn’t realize there was more than 1 area to pull into so we weren’t near a lake but for 1 night we were very happy with what we had. Very few neighbors and all far away. We only paid $10 with the America the Beautiful pass and as far as Paid Caprock Canyons State Park Camping Spots go its a keeper. Left the money in an envelope. You cant beat that! The road is unpaved but not too bad. Our spot was perfectly level and we had a good cell signal with T mobile. The road in is Paved. There are 30 or more campsites at this location and the maximum RV length is unlimited. You may stay 14 days at Lake McClellan Campground.

Amenities:

ADA accessible
BBQ Grill
Boat Ramp
Drinking Water
Dump Station
Fire Ring
Near Water
Pets Welcome
Picnic Tables
Restrooms
Playground
Showers
Trash Cans

3. Paid Caprock Canyons State Park Camping Spots – Pioneer County Park

Wellington, Texas
GPS: 34.959473, -100.221857
Elevation: 1962′

Public – County Park (Official)

Cost $10 Day

30 amp & $15/50 amp. Long pull thru. Water at site. Dump station.C Lots of tre. 3 day max. Drop box for fee. About 6 MI north of Wellington on west side of divided hwy 83.

Update: There is now a camp host to collect your fees. The lady was very friendly and allowed us to use a site to have lunch,fill our fresh water tank and use the dump station-no charge!! We did not stay overnight, however, we did make a $5 donation to the park.

4. Paid Caprock Canyons State Park Camping Spots – Copper Breaks State Park

Cost $10 Day

Quanah, Texas
GPS: 34.112089, -99.75174
Elevation: 1381′

One of a handful of International Dark Sky Parks in Texas, I loved this place for a jumping off Paid Caprock Canyons State Park Camping Spots to begin my trip! I usually avoid Texas State Parks because they are lit up like prisons at night. But Copper Breaks is dark and quiet. There are nice Tent, Equestrian, and group sites down in the canyon with water and hot showers for $10 plus your $2 entrance fee.

Camping Locations Inside Caprock Canyons State Park

Campsites with Electricity (50 amp)

Cost $22 Day

People per Site: 8 Number of Sites: 10
These sites are in the Honey Flat Area.

Amenities:

Picnic table
Fire ring
Water hookup
50 amp hookup
Shade shelter
Lantern post
Restrooms nearby

Campsites with Electricity (30 amp)

Cost $17 Day

People per Site: 8 Number of Sites: 25
These sites are in the Honey Flat Area.

Amenities:

Picnic table
Fire ring
Water hookup
Restrooms nearby
30-amp electric
Shade shelter
Lantern post

Campsites with Water

Cost $14 Day

People per Site: 8 Number of Sites: 9
These sites are in the Lake Theo area.

Amenities:

Picnic table
Fire ring
Water nearby
Shade shelter
Lantern post
Restrooms nearby

Primitive Campsites (Walk-in | Little Red)

Cost $14 Day

People per Site: 8 Number of Sites: 10
Located in the Little Red Camping Area. Tent camping only. Walk in 10-30 yards from parking area. Bring your own water and carry out all trash. There are no showers.

Amenities:

Fire ring/grill
Covered picnic tables
Organic toilet

Primitive Campsites (Walk-in | South Prong)

Cost $12 Day

People per Site: 8 Number of Sites: 30
Located in the South Prong Camping Area. Tent camping only. Walk in 10-30 yards from parking area. You must bring your own water and carry out all trash. There are no showers.

Amenities:

Fire ring/grill
Organic toilets

Primitive Campsites (Hike-in)

Cost $12 Day

People per Site: 4 Number of Sites: 40
Located in the North Prong and South Prong Primitive Camping Areas. 16.3 miles of associated trails.

Amenities:

One-mile hike to camping area
Bring drinking water
All trash must be carried out
Pets allowed on leash only
No ground fires allowed
Composting toilets nearby

Primitive Campsites (Hike-in | Along Trailway)

Cost $12 Day

People per Site: 4
Primitive camping is available along the length of the Trailway.

Amenities:

Seven-mile minimum hike/bike
No potable water
Bring your own drinking water
No campfires allowed
Containerized fuel stoves allowed
All trash must be carried out
Chemical restrooms available

Caprock Canyons State Park

History

A brisk breeze greeted me as I reached the canyon walls. Panoramic vistas as far as the eye could see were the reward for the climb up the red rock surface. I imagined what it may have been like thousands of years ago as if I had traveled back in time. This could be the same vision that the earliest people encountered when they first arrived in the region: untamed and harsh topography equaled only by the beauty of the landscape.

Early Occupants

The earliest artifacts demonstrate that more than 10,000 years ago, the first people settled among the red sandstone cliffs of Caprock Canyon. These earliest Native Americans were hunters and gatherers who made a living off of the abundant wildlife in the region. These Paleolithic People left behind a variety of artifacts, such as oval knives, spear points, and boiling pebbles for preparing food. This manner of existence persisted until the arrival of the first Europeans more than 800 years ago.

Spaniards under the command of the Spanish explorer Francisco Vazquez de Coronado were the first Europeans to visit the canyons in 1541. The Apache, a group of plains Indians, first acquired horses around this time and went on to become the renowned buffalo hunters we know today. Up before the arrival of Comanche tribes, they ruled the region. The time of the Native Americans came to an end when Anglo settlers started settling the region in the 1870s.

The First Settlers

Charles Goodnight, a well-known rancher and cattleman, settled in Palo Duro Canyon in 1876. He then went on to buy vast tracts of property, creating the J.A. Ranch and guarding the nearly extinct Texas plains bison herd. By that time, the train had reached Quitaque, a little town with a population of 30 people, in the west. As more residents moved in, the area that had been known as the J.A. Ranch changed hands multiple times before being bought by the state of Texas in 1975. Caprock Canyons State Park was established as a state park in 1982.

Modern Day

Protected from extinction, goodnight. Roadrunners, prairie dogs, mule deer, pronghorn antelope, and aoudad are just a few of the numerous creatures that may be found in the red rock canyons.

The Future

Because of the rich history and unique beauty with in this park we have partnered with the Caprock Partners Foundation to help in the restoration of the canyon to its natural state, prior to European settlement (approximately 300 years ago). This includes the restoration of mixed grass prairies, rolling plains and native animals (ex: bison, prairie dogs, pronghorn antelope). Coming full circle, the history of Caprock Canyons looks bright in part to those who support and work tirelessly to preserve this hidden gem in the Texas panhandle. Please join us and help support the preservation of wild places, wildlife, and unique cultures.

Free Caprock Canyons State Park Boondocking

Things To Do During Your Visit

One of Texas’s best-kept secrets is located 100 miles southeast of Amarillo. Over 15,000 acres of untamed, West Texas terrain make up Caprock Canyons State Park, which was established in 1982. Along the Llano Estacado’s eastern border is where you’ll find Caprock Canyons. Here, the Staked Plains and Permian Plains abruptly converge.

Park Activities

Through a range of activities, park visitors can take advantage of Caprock Canyons’ natural beauty. Customers get the chance to experience the magnificence of Caprock Canyons through hiking, bicycling, camping, fishing, and horseback riding.

Beginner and intermediate routes along the Caprock Canyons Trailway are one type of path in Caprock Canyons, while more difficult and secluded trails can be found inside the park. In fact, there are about 90 miles of outdoor hiking and bike routes. Short and primarily level, easy paths include the Mesa Trail. Longer, cliffier, and more difficult hikes include Haynes Ridge Overlook Trail. Please be aware that the more challenging trails should only be attempted by skilled hikers and bikers.

Hiking

It’s vital to follow a few general hiking rules when trekking in Caprock Canyons. Most significantly, hikers ought to show consideration for fellow hikers and the environment. Walking a trail is only one aspect of hiking. Most hikers like taking in the sights of the creatures and vegetation that populate the pathways. While hiking silently, other groups can take in the sounds of nature without being disturbed by shouting or ringing cell phones. However, a kind greeting upon passing another hiker lets them know that there are others nearby.

Hikers should move to the trail’s edge when taking breaks so that other hikers can pass. Downhill walkers must give way to uphill hikers. Don’t occupy the entire trail when hiking in groups. Allow other groups and hikers to pass. Do not leave any garbage or other traces of your hike behind. Carry it out if you brought it in. Even biodegradable objects like apple cores are ugly and might harm local fauna. Never give food to animals. Feeding them causes disruptions to their normal foraging routines. If you bring a pet, make sure to keep it contained and leashed. Pack out their trash as well. It’s crucial to leave trails and ecosystems exactly as you found them.

The ecosystem is ruined for upcoming hikers when it is removed or altered. Leave the plants, objects, and rocks where they are. Moreover, avoid interacting with any wildlife. Maintain a safe distance and your composure. To continue your trek, make slow progress down the trail. Hikers should always stay on the trails to prevent ecosystem damage and protect the routes. By disrupting the ecosystems of the pathways, leaving them can harm or even kill nearby plants and animals. Lastly, hikers need to be conscious of their surroundings. Watch the weather, the landscape, and the wildlife. Being safe means being informed.

Biking

Almost all of the trails in Caprock Canyons enable biking. For seasoned mountain bikers, the trails in the canyons are moderate to challenging. Less difficult trails, such the start of the Canyon Rim Trail and the Eagle Point Trail, are recommended for cyclists with less experience. There are numerous sandy creek crossings on three pathways. Upper South Prong, Lower South Prong, and Lower North Prong Trails make up these routes. These trails are less suitable for biking because of the sand. Due to its slope and switchbacks, one trail, the Haynes Ridge Trail, is inaccessible by bicycle.

Biker safety precautions are similar to those for hikers. Ride only on paths that are open, leave no evidence of your visit, regulate your bicycle, and never startle wildlife. These are just a few general trail regulations.

There are countless kilometers of trails in Caprock Canyons. Simply choose a new trail for your journey if trails or roads are closed. Do not ride on federal or state-protected wilderness areas; instead, obtain permission or permits before entering private property. Never make new trails. Use the trails if they aren’t too soft or muddy for riding without damaging the trailbed. Although biking is thrilling, it’s crucial to maintain control at all times. Ride within your comfort zone, adhere to speed limits, and remain vigilant. Be polite to other trail users when you come across them. With a warm welcome, let them know you’re coming. As you turn corners, keep an eye out for other people. Riders going uphill and pedestrians should yield.

Plan ready for your trip, whether you intend to go riding or hiking. Do some trail and trip research. Being well-prepared is considerably simpler than having to rush at the last minute. Include lots of water in your necessities bag. Keep supplies on hand in case the weather or other circumstances change. Know the trail signs that indicate the difficulty of the trail if you’re biking. You should be knowledgeable with your tools and aware of your advantages and disadvantages. Don a helmet and other protective clothing.

Animals that might be present on the trail should be expected by hikers and cyclists. Animals in fear can be quite harmful. On the trails, always be on guard. Animals can be startled by sudden movements and loud noises. Give animals ample space and time to become used to you being there. Follow riders on horses’ passing instructions as you come across them. Animals that are domesticated or wild should not be disturbed. Both you and any wildlife you come into contact with will be safe if you are prepared and vigilant.

Camping

Caprock Canyons State Park and Trailway also enables camping in addition to day hikes and bike rides. Campers can use the undeveloped sites along the Trailway or the campsites in parks for their overnight stays. Visitors can set up tent at the Honey Flat with access to water and electricity. Water and two horse corrals are available at Wildhorse. There is a picnic shelter but no water or electricity in the Little Red area. There is no water or electricity at the South Prong campsite. The North Prong and South Prong Hike Ins are two hike-in campsites available for campers that are more daring. You must backpack more than a mile down the trail to reach these places. These locations don’t have electricity or water. Make sure to stay inside the park’s limits when camping along the Trailway. You should book your camping place in advance online to avoid disappointment because Caprock Canyon State Park’s campsites tend to fill up quickly.

Horseback Riding

There are about 20 miles of equestrian paths at Caprock Canyon State Park. The footing on the trails is mostly packed or soft sand, with brief portions of hard base and rock. There are many dry washers. The difficulty of the trails varies. Steep ascents give way to breathtaking vistas and amazing scenery. Some trails have incredibly steep climbs and descents, so be prepared. Trails in the canyon bottom generally follow dry or sporadic spring-fed brook beds. Visually striking is the diversity of the geology and soil kinds.

A herd of bison roam freely around the park. On paths, bison may be encountered by riders. The park’s green meadows are preferred by the bison. In the dry red canyons where there is less grass, there are less of them. As long as they have enough room and are not intruded upon, bison do not attack horses. Give them plenty of room and yield to them.

There are 12 sites in the Wild Horse Equestrian Campground. A windmill and cattle watering tank can be found in the picturesque campground. The camp is surrounded by big mesquite and juniper trees, which provide some privacy between sites. There are tables, fire pits, and corrals at each site. The pipe corrals have a lovely sandy bottom. Each location has access to water. no electrical power. The campground is next to a dump site. The campground doesn’t have any facilities, however there are plenty nearby.

This campground will fill up on holiday weekends. Call ahead!!

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